Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Too Much Holiday? Trouble Painting?

Up In The Air; Photography; Patterns; Abstraction




North Shore, Mirror Lake; Landscape; Photography; Patterns; Abstraction


Me too.

I've had trouble painting nearly this whole holiday season, so I gladly participated in Martine Alison's 7photos/7days/7friends Nature Photography challenge. At least I was doing something arty, instead of sitting at my computer playing endless games of Solitaire and  combing through my Mexico photos trying to choose good headshots for drawing sessions.

Though I said, in my last post, I was going to finish  the challenge up with Rain, the reference photo I used for a painting of the same name, I did not.  I found these two and was impressed by how abstract they were and how much I depended upon the abstraction in painting. 

Abstractions seems to be shunned by the masses; realism is king. I never understood why.  All paintings begin with abstract forms. Indeed, painting itself is the creation of  a sense of the  three dimensional on a two dimensional plane, but then, sadly what does the public know about art? Zilch,  Too bad for them.

Looking through my photo files, I realized I see abstract forms first when I look through a camera lens. And when I compose a painting, I put those abstract shapes down first.  From there, I move towards realism..

Sometimes I get there, sometimes I stop short.  Most often for me, the more detailed a painting becomes, the more static it becomes--the more glued down, nailed down and lifeless the subject.    While I do admire super realism, painting that way makes me crazy...

My son told me once, "Mom, you think too much",  Seems I do. Best to leave these thoughts in my last post of 2015.

May you all have a healthy, healthy, happy, happy New Year! Travel safe and may the force be with you.


A FEW ABSTRACT BEGINNINGS I DESIDED WERE THE END


An abstract study of grasses. 



 

Deborah's Pond; Oils; Landscape; Abstraction



 

Birds of Paradise; Watercolor; Abstraction




 

8 comments:

  1. Another year passed by. Your talents are still very much intact I see.
    May 2016 bring good health, much laughter and creative times for you and Elliot.

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    1. Hopefully this next year will be filled with art rather than health issues. Going into January, the outlook looks good for Ellis and me. Thank you so much for your good wishes. I wish the same for you and yours in 2016.

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  2. I'm just a Philistine I guess! :)

    Still better the masses find art in realism than never find it at all. The more I blog the more I'm drawn (no pun intended) to the work of my friends who focus on abstract or impressionism, yet I don't feel remotely inclined to follow their lead. I just do what I do because I want to ... if it's art I produce then it's because others call it that. But you know me by now, Linda, I might find myself painting an abstract one day because the wind blew me in that direction.
    I know the other side of you too ... the draftsman, architect ... Ms Precise ... like a spinning coin that landed Arty side up today. Whatever you do I usually love, even if I don't always understand the finer points.

    Happy and Very Healthy 2016 to you both. Let's kick the A*ss out of this year old pal ...WOO HOO ... onwards and upwards!!

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    1. Good riddens to 2015 that's for sure. In 2016, I pray there are no more surprises with regards to health. I've had enough.

      As for abstraction, I am just saying that all paintings begin with the abstract and the artist brings it towards realism depending upon her needs at the time. Sometimes I am satisfied with just the suggestion of the subject--as in the lower examples. Then there are subjects I want to paint as precisely as possible. I seem to let the subject and my feelings towards it dictate the degree of finish. I have always done this.

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  3. Interesting to read your artistic process. I like to see patterns as well, and I love your abstractions. I love the realism of the old masters, but in my own painting I like to simplify, or maybe that is just an excuse because I can't paint realistic. Maybe it is different with oils and acrylics.

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    1. After my experience with the Venetian process, I think anybody and everybody can paint super realistic as long as they can stand the tedium of all that scumbling. 😄. Of course I've always thought everyone could draw if they'd give it a try. The medium doesn't have anything to do with it. Patience has everything to do with it.

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  4. Well, you have the art of painting in a nutshell, start abstract and refine as much or as little as you please. And don't we all do that?
    Happy new year to you and Ellis, and wishing you arty problems and not health ones!

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  5. Too many holidays make me lazy to take everything, not just painting.
    I call this "the effect schoolboy" !!!
    Then this will pass, even the darkness of these days helps to increase for me "the effect lazy schoolboy", after my holidays.
    I love your work on abstraction; I see all the forms of nature always connected to abstraction...I love it.

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