Sunday, April 3, 2016

Paintin' Drawin' and Shippin' Out

Morris and Morris and Morris.

Morris is nailed to my easel.  Slowly, progress is being made, but it can hardly be detected by the casual eye.  Details and values are all absorbing. The neck and tuning mechanisms of the guitar is as important  as the features of the guitarist's face. The frets must be believable. The hands must have strings to strum.


Detail:  The neck of the guitar in the foreground is key to making the guitar believable.  It's also key to
creating  a sense of deep space.  It must seem real.  This is a challenge having little experience in this photo realistic
painting form.  If I fudge, it must be only to a minute degree, 



The hands must be believable too.  The hand in the background doesn't exist by itself. It's attached to a wrist bent a
a certain way, and arm curved a certain way, a shoulder that relates to the far side of his face.  Slow and easy
does it.  Lots of looking before the brush is laid down. 
Drawing is constantly being corrected.  Values are constantly being judged and altered.  I am enjoying this slow ride. When I finish a session, I feel like I accomplished something. 


For relief, Daily Drawings. 



RQV, graphite, 6" x 8"




My Lips Are Sealed, graphite, 6" x 8"




Louise's Sister Sara, graphite, 6" x 8"




Willem De Kooning, graphite, 6" x 8"




THE  Chapeau, graphite, 8" x 6"



Hank was varnished and sent home to his parents.  Ruby, JD and everybody else will be following soon.  I think it's better that the paintings be with their families instead of sitting in a dark corner in the storage room.  I am hoping they will put smiles on people's faces.


Hank was the first out the studio door.  The 9" x 11" oil sketch on canvas board was painted in 2012.
 



10 comments:

  1. Ik weet gewoon niet waar ik moet beginnen het is zo mooi prachtig super gedaan lieve groetjes Danielle

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    1. Thank you Danielle. Drawing is an everyday thing, but this painting progresses depending on amount of time needed for paint to dry and how good my bum knee is for standing at the easel. It's slow going.

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  2. Nice to see them all together, Linda. I love Rita's portrait, I recognised her at once!

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    1. Thanks Judy. Rita and I FB message quite a bit. When she showed me this recent photo, I couldn't help snatching it for a reference.

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  3. So much beautiful work, Linda!!! First - Hank is perfect - love the unique pose and those bright colors. I am sure his parents love the painting. Your drawings, with your bold technique, speak volumes. And Morris just keeps getting better and better!!!
    You really are creating some beautiful and strong work!
    Kathryn

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    1. Thanks Kathryn. Drawing seems to be my strong point these days. My right knee is limiting my stand up and paint time; it's a good thing dry time is an important part of this painting method. I will put an end to this in the next months.

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  4. How beautiful show of your works! Morris is coming out lifelike,Il MAESTRO di CHITARRA: Beautiful graphite drawings... and thank you for portray me,dear friend.I wish you a good start of week!!!

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    1. You do know this painting is trying my patience at the same time it is shoving me on. The century old method is as serious as painting gets. Have never been that serious about painting, I have found the discipline involved oddly attractive and something I wish to acquire.

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  5. All brilliant Linda. Espacialy the Guitarist, fantastic. Linda, i am still not receiving your post`s. I should not be bothering you about this, but your Drawings are so brilliant, i must see them. All the best Linda.
    Vic.

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    1. Thanks Victor. I have no idea why--and worse: I have no idea how to fix the situation. Do you have an idea where I should go to check on this? I will poke around on my own though.

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