Monday, June 15, 2015

Feeling The Subject; Visualizing The Possibilities

GET ACQUAINTED SKETCH IN PROGRESS, graphite, 6" x 8"

The house is quiet. I'm alone. Our house guests are off at the Nazcar races.  Ellis went to the market to get Honey Nut Cherrios and Eggo Waffles, the preferred breakfast foods of the under aged  and grandpas. It's raining, not a light drizzle, but a steady downpour that washes streets clean, soaks lawns green and makes sitting on drenched bleachers watching high powered cars roar around a track 200 times a true act of love and devotion.

Dry and comfortable at home waiting for the final lap or a thunder and lighting storm,  I took out my pencils and began a get acquainted sketch of my friend's husband, my old guitar teacher. I was not one of his better students; I wasn't in his class for long. Classical guitar was not my thing.  But his wife's wonderful reference photograph is.  Cropped in close, this could lead to a painting, but first
to feel the subject, learn the angles, the spacing, get acquainted and visualize the possibilities.


 

6 comments:

  1. That is such a good idea! I wish I could be bothered, I might get better results!

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    1. As exciting as it is to start a new painting, I think familiarizing yourself with the unique qualities of a subject enables you to put together a loose plan for a larger piece,, especially in portraiture. What to put in, what to eliminate, which lines and shadows insure a good likeness is discovered in a get acquainted sketch. A thumbnail is great for planning compositions, but a sketch determines what details must be included and properly placed. These kind of sketches also let you know if you want to put in the effort on a largeriece or forget it altogether. Portraits are time consuming. Why waste your time and materials on a subject that's not going to hold your interest for the time it takes?

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  2. At first, I thought it was Andre Segovia. Your old teacher has that same intense, focused [almost lost] look on his face, in his eyes. I think this would make a fabulous work, either as a more "finished" drawing or a painting.
    Kathryn

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    1. I will finish the drawing--and I can see a lovely, dramatically lighted painting. His intense look took most of the drawing time.

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  3. love this drawing...and how you can tell that it is a guitar.

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    1. Thanks Celeste. It does look almost complete as is. A few more shadows and it can stand as a sketch. This has the makings of a really good painting--whether I get to it is another story. I have been in flux lately. I think I need to do a real crappy, carefree painting before I get serious again.

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