Monday, January 5, 2015

Moving To The Hot Tub

I'll Be In The Hot Tub,  graphite, 6 x 8, Thirty minute daily drawing
She'll be in the hot tub, I'll be in the studio.  I'd rather be with her!

New Years celebrations ended for us Saturday with a three hour lunch with friends.  Winter came to Michigan with a nasty, icy rain and a light dusting of snow. It was no accident I chose this woman on the beach calling to her kids to draw--and to paint. I liked where she was at.  I liked her polka dot cover up while I wore my thermal gear. I liked her full figure as I triatheloned  thee elliptical trainer, the tread mill and the stationary bike.  I liked that she was on the move. So was I. I started a little painting in the PM.  I was rusty, but I was back in the studio and I was free handing it.

It's a start, but no cigar--as yet.  Oil on canvas panel, 9 x 12 sketch


Sharon, 8x6, thirty minute daily drawing, graphite.

Sharon was easy to talk to. A crack whip, a really intelligent gal Ellis took to; she loved doing the same thing he did--shopping the best deals at the best hotels.  I liked her too, but as easy as she was to talk with, she was not an easy draw.  She has got fabulous hair!  It screams to be painted for it's a challenge in color variations, (outstanding highlight job),  turns and twists, highs and lows with plenty of wisps--the stuff for an extra fine brush. 

10 comments:

  1. That hot tub gal is a wonderful sketch and I think will make for a great painting! She is mid stride with foot lifted and moving forward, finger pointing the way and face turned to shout something to someone - just fabulous!

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    1. Thank you so much Susan! The painting is going okay, but I haven't gotten frustrated enough for it to go better. Small canvases make me uptight. It takes a while--and some goofs--to get me to throw caution to the wind. It took me a while and a lot of anguish before I discovered this. Now that I know it's how I work, I just go with the flow. For better or worse.

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  2. What a wonderful gesture sketch you produced, you've caught a real sense of personality.

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    1. Thank you Mick. I have no trouble nailing the gesture with drawing materials, but paint is another thing. Lots of wiping out took place before I got her weight supported on the stationary leg.

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  3. really great sketch...I love her foot!

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    1. Thanks. I hope the painting will be as successful. So far she's off kilter.--her or me that is. :-))

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  4. I love the way you covert chance meetings into artistic reality. I'm the opposite: an idea occurs and I go searching for reality to use as a model ...usually don't find it.

    The second face is very strong isn't it? the firm jaw-line and steady gaze. You've captured far more than just the external image.

    I was listening to the radio a I drove back from the airport. They were discussing the Lipinski Stradivarius that was stolen from Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra Concertmaster Frank Almond. The history of this violin was so amazing that I would like to paint it ... I've spent ever since searching for the image of it that fits the painting in my head!

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    1. Both approaches are valid. I sketched the founding fathers when I was reading American history. Examining their features, the look in their eye as seen by another artist was interesting, but not as interesting as drawing people I've met and experienced first hand. I add what I felt.

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  5. Bonjour chère amie,

    J'adore le mouvement dans ce joli croquis... Un croquis vivant à souhait !
    Gros bisous ♡

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    1. Thank you Martinealison. I do love to do figures in action, people living their lives.

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