Friday, January 2, 2015

Mama Mia Did I Screw Up!

Mia, 4 x 4, graphite, Thirty Minute  daily drawing session

As soon I saw this young woman in the hat she bought from a vendor on the beach, I saw her as a painting--three quarter figure portrait. She had a fragile quality I found attractive--very dark hair, pale skin, very feminine, very quaint  beach cover up in this age of sheer and flaunt it. I chose to spend thirty minutes this morning getting acquainted with her profile, before I headed to the canvas.  Good thing too, for I had a lot to learn about the twist of her head and the half light cast on her features by the hat. --But then that's what short drawings are about--getting acquainted. I'd rather erase and erase pencil then wipe out paint. Years still need to be erased.

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12 comments:

  1. Je bent veel te streng voor jezelf ik vind het zo knap dat je dat zo snel op het doek zet geniet er ook eens van lieve groetjes Danielle

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    1. I am hard on myself, you're right. But that's how I will get better: one drawing, one painting at a time. Of course, where I'm going with this at this time in life is another story. :-)). I am sorry I didn't take drawing and painting more seriously sooner, but I did save the best for last and I am having a delicious time!

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  2. Its 'funny' how what we think is easy, often times isn't.. :-)... Your last sentence makes me think- do u mean the years off the woman? or your supposed mistakes...Erasing to be just right, what's wrong w/what u have? that may be the true portrait..

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    1. Years off the woman. She was young, twenty eight. No, the young lady doesn't quite look like herself. Another pass is required. Erasing is as important in drawing as making a line. Drawing quick often gets a good impression with lots of energy, but too quick misses innuendos that make each of us uniquely ourselves.

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    2. her features look angular... was she thin? usually angular people can look older..

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  3. I like the drawing....even if it isn't a perfect resemblance. Such a cool hat! Keep the drawings coming. I agree so much, drawing is the key to everything. :)

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    1. Thirty minutes is just thirty minutes. I'm not that upset. It's a good enough likeness for her family to know it's her. It just doesn't capture her as I saw her. That would have taken a bit more time, but my Sun Torch turned off and that ended the session; it was time for breakfast. :-)) She will probably end up on my easel for a paint session--if these holidays ever end! I have one more celebratory luncheon to go to today. Then tomorrow perhaps, but Monday for sure. Honey goes back to work!

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  4. It is an intriguing woman and an intriguing pose. I can see what attracted you to her.

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    1. After shooting her in the hat. I took a three quarter shot. She was sitting and chatting with a guy. Then both of them got up and started to leave. They passed by and I told her I loved her straw hat. It looked great. They stopped. We started to chat and ended up chatting for an hour or more. They had just become engaged and we're off to The Riviera Maya where they rented a vacation home. She was about to meet her future mother in-law for the first time and was nervous. She had nothing to be nervous about. She was lovely, I told her. We chatted so much, I missed to take a frontal shot---but not really. The sun was directly over our heads. Bad shadows.

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  5. Hard to keep up with you at the moment, Linda. Every time our company goes out, I try to paint, which leaves little time for blogging. Meanwhile you are turning out these 'Diamond' drawings at the speed of light. I love them all! You're so gifted ... well ... it's not a gift, it's years of hard work ... but you know what I mean

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    1. Thanks John. Drawing has been a lifelong interest.

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