Thursday, September 4, 2014

King of The Castle

King of The Castle

As I was working on Henry today, I was reminded of the childhood notion that you were the king of the castle when you claimed ownership of a rock as soon as you sat or stood on it.  I immediately liked the title for this painting of my great--or is it grand-- nephew Henry?  No matter, he's coming along fine.  I left the studio with two observations from my work:  pencil doesn't cover that easily; I should take better care of my brushes.  --And thinking about that as I write, one more:  I must get some turpentine.  As much as I hate the odor, it's better than mineral spirits for cleaning dried paint off brushes--and clothing.  You're going to paint in oils, or you're going to paint in oils.

School starts Monday.  I'm excited.  I'm all packed and ready to go.  For the reference, I am liking my son and grandson shaving--for the 24 x 36" linen canvas I bought. But then today, I'm thinking I don't have to use that  canvas just because I bought it, I have others--like a cotton,15 x 45"--that would be perfect for Sunday Nap.  Anyway I have all three reference photos ready and will take them along to see what the other kids have--not that it will matter. Jon and son are the perfect subject matter for the High Renaissance style technique. The photo tells a story in monochromatic color with lots of contrasts; precise drawing and glazed finish is apropos.  I also like the humor in choosing a very modern subject to do the old world way.  If  it's not going to be fun...

.Ellis' feet, the arm of the couch and the cocktail table will be removed. 




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19 comments:

  1. Beautiful painting of your great nephew. I actually like the shoes in pencil as a final piece, but heyho that's me, I think it reminds the viewer of the child in the picture. :-)

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    1. I am working my way down. I wish I could leave them like that, but there's too much finish on the rest of him--besides, they have red stripes on them. I can't leave the kid stripe less . :-)) Thanks Ann

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  2. Het word steeds mooier die ogen prachtig hoor Helen lieve groetjes Daniƫlle

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    1. His eyes are sweet. I am very fond of this child whom I just met for the first time last April. He's my brother in-law's grandchild and his name sake. My brother in-law passed away way too young and never had the pleasure. I like the fact that Henry is still around in this little guy. It's a pleasure painting him.

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    2. I love the portrait of child and the title that you gave to the work. I understand deeply the meaning of the title ....
      Best wishes for the school that begins on Monday.
      The sense of discovery and experimentation may be for you a magical moment .
      I agree with the choice of topics unusual for a classic use of the color. Contrast feeds art and beauty.
      Have nice september week end!

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    3. I'm looking forward to it, though leaving my studio is strange. I really dislike having to transport a lot of supplies to a less comfortable, accommodating, setting. But the instructor is an accomplished painter. I just hope he's also an accomplished instructor. My crotchety attitude is age appropriate. My willingness to put that aside, is my drive for excellence in this year of enlightenment.

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  3. Wow...Linda! He's coming along SO beautifully!! very handsome little boy...I look forward to seeing it finished!!!!

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    1. Thanks Hilda. I am at the point when I wish I knew more about using glazes. I have a feeling I will thirteen weeks from Monday. Glazes are why I'm interested in the technique, the class.

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  4. Hello Linda!
    Great painting of Henry! The colors are luminous! Beautiful! Great subject matter of course! Love the name, Henry!
    Good luck in school. Great reference photo! Love all your art and family photos! Keep up the great work!
    Michael

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    1. Thanks Michael. It's been a while--like decades--since I took a painting class. When it comes to painting, I am more or less self taught. I do like to follow where my curiosity leads. This year, it led me to Todd Burroughs and the Venetian technique. As Richard Bach said, books fall open to the right page. While I love the gestural technique, an understanding of the Venetian might balance things out quite nicely.

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  5. The little king of the castle is really coming along well , I can picture him moving his feet up and down in excitement :-) I think you could get odorless turpentine so you don't get that awful smell.

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    1. Thanks Jane, will odorless turpentine have the same power as the original? Richard Schmid used it was first washes, because it dried faster than mineral spirits. I haven't found the drying speed of mineral spirits to be a problem. I want turpentine for spot removal. Paint seems to jump on me in place not protected by my apron. --I use a hair dryer If I want the initial color wash drawing totally dry before laying in other colors. Of course, I will try the odorless turp first. The odor of turpentine is why I gave up oils years ago. It made me sick

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  6. One of your best, LW...! I know from experience that painting children is a challenge. Oftentimes they come out looking like wee older people--but you've just nailed it here...he is so very childlike.They have such delicate skin! Love everything about it...I'll be watching for the next step.

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    1. Shoes. Pant leg relationships. The rock. I'm experimenting with a very limited, Zorn-like palette with this one. I'm using Cad Red Medium instead of Alizarin and just bought Quinacridone Violet to replace Alizarin. I'm following Wilcox's findings with regards to permanency. As I head off for class, it is difficult thinking I am going to paint anything worthwhile without one cadmium or violet in my paint box.

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  7. Linda, "King of the Castle" is coming along perfectly! I appreciate how difficult it is to paint children, and you truly are doing a superb job. What an expression on Henry's face!
    As for class, you'll be a star! Have FUN!!!!!
    Kathryn

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    1. I hope not. I don't want to arrive knowing everything because I don't. That's why I'm taking the class. Glazes? Oil mediums? varnishes?

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  8. Hi Linda - everyone has said it all already regarding your lovely rendition of the young King.
    But, me - I am totally involved with your ruminations on the upcoming class. Giving me quite a lift. Hoping to learn new things from you.
    Regarding turps. Robert Gamblin l gave a gift to artists when he developed GAMSOL.. I think it has a bit of oil in it so it does not dissipate into the air as quickly as other odorless turps. Not as harmful. I have tested it with two open jars and the other brand disappeared so quickly, it amazed us all. That is why OSHA allows only Gamsol in university classrooms, etc,anymore. When I think of art school and the real turps wafting into our central nervous system.
    ..wow - makes me shudder. You may want to try it.

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    1. Thanks. That's the one I'm using. In fact, I bought all Gamblin paints and oils--also Old Holland Venetian Red. I did not get yet Gamblin linseed oil. I had a full can of Grumbacher and had spent enough racing my inferior paints. Next purchase. I'm not going to ain't with turpentine, I'm going to have a small quantity in the laundry room for unnoticed dried oil paint spots on clothing--to use as a spot remover.

      I asked Gamblin for literature on their products a while ago. So far they have not responded.

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  9. This painting is PHENOMENAL!
    Peer networking aside, you don't need a class. You could teach a class.

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