Saturday, August 30, 2014

A Little Labor Over The Holiday

I gave Henry some color and had him take a seat while



I looked up other paintings that began the Venetian way. The father and daughter Gentileschi painted two of my favorites.  

Judith and Her Maidservant, the Head of Holofernes, Artemisia Gentileschi, 1593-1653.
During the Women's' movement, I became very interested in women artists in history.
I noted too few in my college text.  Artemisia's work looked pretty competent to me.

 


As competent as her dad's Woman With Violin, (Ortazio Gentileschi).
 Color isn't lacking.  Loose brushwork is. I'm about to explore 
the other side of representational painting. 

19 comments:

  1. The freshness of your painting is wonderful.
    I love Artemisia work. I have seen several of her paintings and lived close to one for many years.
    Color isn't lacking - I agree, but they used the dark brown backgrounds to make them work in many cases.
    Glazing was important - I think but not sure- so that is why the brushwork was smooth. I genuinely am looking forward for you to fill us in as you go along. I do know I loved Titian's work. And ,although not of the venetian school but influenced by some of its painters, Velasquez was my fav out of all of them. Brushwork!!!!

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    1. Brushwork gives life to color. I know nothing about glazing. In thirteen weeks, I should have an understanding. While I love the gusto of the gestural style, I also admire the precision of the traditional style. I'm looking forward to getting a handle on on this historic discipline. I've avoided it do due to the emphasis it places on patience. Patience is not a strong point.

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  2. Henry is absolutely adorable ...love the rich colors you used for his shirt and pants, Linda... Beautiful work!!! I as well, LOVE Artemisia's work..
    Amazing colors and the dark shadows call me!!

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    1. Thanks Hilda. He is a fun one to paint. I adore little ones. There is so much promise. I also adore starting a painting, for the same reasons, although this pencil-first start was very foreign to me. When I added the color, it felt like I was back in kindergarten coloring in a coloring book--very tight approach. The lines of the initial drawing were confining till I loosened up laying in the rock and wiping in a background. This is a very odd way to paint. I guess I'm still in a tentative state? The next thirteen weeks with the Venetian Technique will be interesting. I'm hoping I can find a nice blend between old and new methods.

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  3. Bonjour,
    Je suis très heureuse de pouvoir à nouveau ouvrir les portes des blogs... après mes longues semaines d'absence.
    Une très belle peinture que celle de ce petit Henry en cours. J'aime beaucoup sa petite frimousse et la manière dont il confine ses petites mains.
    Gros bisous

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    1. It's nice to see you are back. Thank you Martine. Henry is a delightful subject. I have a special place in my heart for little boys.

      il est agréable de voir que vous êtes de retour. Merci Martine. henry est un sujet agréable. J'ai une place spéciale dans mon coeur pour les petits garçons

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  4. Beautiful drawing/painting. I am excited for you ..in this new class. I hope you'll blog about it (and "take us along"). I sure understand the nerves you described--but I know you, you'll get over it and open your heart and mind to the learning process...that is how you are. I guess nerves are a good thing, because for one thing it reminds you that you care about the outcome and you want to do your best. I think it would be odd to make a start with a pencil too...but there are so many ways to get an image on a canvas. Love your little man's pose. :)

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    1. That about describes it. Up till I laid in the rock and a diagonal receding to the background, Henry was a kid in a coloring book--delineated and flat. I couldn't stand how static he was. The rock shook me loose. But loose is not Venetian, 16th century. My guys shaving isn't a loose painting. I am leaning towards that photo. It's Venetian. The guys are doing something cultural. The palette suits the paint colors on the supply list. And the background can be obliterated and darkened down. I wish the instructor had expounded a bit on the selection of the reference.

      I am not nervous about not being able to paint. I'm nervous about having signed up in the first place. I've spent a lifetime painting in a carefree manner. That's about to change. I hope my logic holds up?

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  5. Adorable Henry is gorgeous - a very good start, despite the pencil. I have yearned for years to paint in the Venetian style, but I too lack patience. My current painting was to be traditional, old master, style, but I am already feeling 'that will do'! And of course , it won't. I say to you, bravo,but most of all, Enjoy!

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  6. PS have you decided what to Paint? I am getting used to the Linen!

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    1. Yes. Jon and JD shaving. The subject suits my interpretation of Venetian, 16th century art. With a modern twist. The technique is going to be slow going. That is a slow going kind of image. Henry is not, so I don't know how much further I will take him?

      I knew where you were headed when you began that portrait. After slashing in Henry's rock, I completely understand stopping now. What more do you need to say what you have to say about your subject.? I like the section of railing in the looser corner; it seats her nicely.

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  7. Henry is looking so good, Linda! His pose is different, in a very good way, and makes for a great composition.
    I love the works of the 15th to 17th c women Dutch painters, and am surprised they are not better known. I didn't really know much about them till a friend gave me a book on women in art. Sadly, I lent it to someone, and it has disappeared.
    Looking forward to your comments and work from your class!!!
    Kathryn

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    1. That's a book I refused to lend. In fact, I won't loan out any of them. I lost one early on that I could have used now!

      While Henry is an experiment, I like the A-symmetrical composition--but I think I'm in the same spot as you were with The Horseman. I need to suggest a horizon, a cut-off. Any thoughts?

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  8. I am really distracted right now, and almost missed this one. I liked the initial sketch and in spite of your own concerns, you really pulled this out of your hat. I really like what you have done so far. Looking forward to see the progress, don't loose that freshness you got going. =)

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    1. Me too. I signed up for something I'm not so sure I should have. I'm curious, but also apprehensive. It might be time to just paint? Yet, I think the discipline would do me good. After this class, I'm taking three weeks off to fiddle about with watercolour and digest the information I've consumed this year. Then, after the holidays, I might have my right knee done? It started acting up a month ago. Whatever time off I take, it will clear my head and the new me will appear on canvas. The bitch is: I write like I have a lifetime in front of me. The truth is I don't. You might not either. Don't let life come between you and that canvas.

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  9. Wat ga je hard mooi hoor Linda lieve groetjes Danielle

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    1. yes, it is. i think familiarizing myself with a time honored approach will strengthen what i already know about the gestural style and possibly lead to a nice blending of the two.

      ja, het is. Ik denk dat het vertrouwd mezelf met een aloude aanpak zal versterken wat ik al weet over de gebaren stijl en mogelijk leiden tot een mooie mix van de twee.

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  10. Hi Linda,
    Please add my name to the growing list of fans of your painting of Henry. It's very good, indeed. A beautifully sensitive work.
    Enjoy your evening!
    Sincerely,
    Gary.

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    1. Thanks Gary. At this moment, in my painting life, I really don't think a pencil is necessary. In thirteen weeks, I'll probably change my mind or be absolutely convinced. Pencil marks do not cover unless the paint layer is really thicks--so what about scumbling?

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