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Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Sky Blue What's New?

SKY BLUE REFLECTIONS, 20" x 20" IS NOW THIS:




IT WAS THIS:



No matter how hard I try to ignore the details and simplify; it is the details, the intersection of the lines, the use of colors, one on top of the other to achieve the values, the distribution of the different weights, that intrigue me. The complexities and their connections in nature that interests me. So I've been plodding along, feeling my way--I still have a ways to go...

In the great outdoors to find a way to the field of wild daffodils that lies in a clearing deep in the woods.This morning, seventy degrees and sunny, was the ideal time to take a look at the situation. As I carefully slide the doorwall open, I was greeted by the steadfast gaze of a deer with a coat warming to the rays of the sun. She froze in her stance and stood there eyeing me as I adjusted my camera to get just the right shot, then took off as I made my way towards her domain.

The Accommodating Doe, digital photograph.
My plan is to have the gardener clear me a path into the woods. But after surveying the possible places of entry, I realized, it's some big job.Viewed up close, instead of from my bedroom window,there were a lot of  barricades between me and  those wild daffodils. While the situation gave me doubts about my idea, I was fascinated by the sculptural formations of the downed trees and the wide range of neutral colors. The structures were gorgeous. Powerful--certainly worthy of painting--worthier of sculpture. 

Reference photograph for painting or sculpting.

Close, But Oh So Far Away; To be Admired, but not touched. This digital photograph was the best I could do--till I find a suitable walking stick--or a guy with a chain saw and machete. 


 










26 comments:

  1. Belli i tuoi riflessi blu e splendide le foto,complimenti!
    Ciao,un abbraccio!

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  2. Thank you Franz. I do love my camera as much as my paints. I used to spend hours in my black and white darkroom developing film, burning in, bleaching out. I still have my Bessler enlarger. I can only paint for about an hour or two a session. Photography was an all day activity.

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  3. The connection between your paintings and the photographs is amazing, even a simple soul like me can see the interplay between and betwixt (love that word). When it comes to photography, alas, I am the antithesis of you!

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    1. Paint what you know. Write what you know. Both pieces of advice are fundamentals as you well know. As far as photography is concerned, you have to break a few eggs, just like drawing and painting. That's why we have the delete key and trash baskets. :-)

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  4. You have created a world in that first picture full of colour, interest and mystery. Lovely. Your walk sounds fascinating and the inspiration you can draw from your encounters ail surely feed your art.

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    1. Thanks Mick. The goal is to create a two dimensional world that fascinates the viewer and holds their attention. No quick glances.

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  5. Hi Linda, Love your painting Sky Blue Reflections, you have really brought it to life. Your garden sounds amazing, being next to a wood.

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    1. Thanks Ann. The woods fascinate, me particularly when the tree forms are clearly defined.

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  6. I liked it before, but I must confess that I think you have improved it. I like also how rough it is. Isn't it strange, when I see you work like this I love it, but when I do it myself, I don't like it. I guess there is things we see in others, that we like, and learn from, but adjust and make it something new that comes more natural. Hmmm.... sorry for rambling, great work.

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    1. Thanks Roger. I couldn't paint like you if I tried. You are not me. I am not you. Every artist should find their own voice and accept it. That takes time, a lot of painting, a lot of looking at art and noticing what satisfies and what doesn't.

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  7. Hi Linda - you live in such a lovely place surrounded by wild woods, wild daffodils and an accommodating wild deer. The photos show us your delight with the nature that surrounds you and your painting takes me there. I love that you can be so free with your brushwork - even when you revisit a piece. I always get so tight when I come back for a second pass. You paint with courage and fearless brushstrokes - I envy you.

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    1. Thank you Susan. Your words are greatly appreciated. As you know, there is a time in painting when the painting takes on a life of it's own and the artist just responds till there"s nothing more to do. That's what guides my brushstrokes. I'm just thrilled I'm using my again. Come visit anytime. I'd love to paint the woods with you.

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  8. Ma chère amie bonjour,
    Je reste admirative devant vos photos... Une nature très généreuse et sauvage vous entoure... On peut sentir qu'elle vous fascine car elle transpire librement dans cette oeuvre.
    La beauté farouche et instinctive...
    Gros bisous

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    1. Martine has written: "Hello my dear friend,
      I remain appreciative to your photos ... A very generous and wild nature around you ... You can feel it because it fascinates you perspire freely in this work.
      The fierce beauty and instinctive ...
      Kisses."

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    2. Dear Martine, I am an instinctive painter. The act is a conversation between me and the canvas. As the artist, I am the initiator. I choose my subjects by whim, by attraction, by fascination. This particular painting is reminding me of the abstractionist who painted calligraphicalyy--if there is such a word. His name escapes me at the moment, but I found his work intriguing. I, however, can never paint purely from my head and ignore the reality of the world around me. --You have made me think. It's best not to when painting.

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    3. My reply in French: Chère Martine, je suis un peintre instinctif. L'acte est une conversation entre moi et la toile. Comme l'artiste, je suis l'initiateur. Je choisis mes sujets par caprice, par attraction, par fascination. Cette peinture particulière me rappelle de la abstractionist qui a peint calligraphicalyy - s'il existe un tel mot. Son nom m'échappe pour le moment, mais j'ai trouvé son travail intéressant. Cependant, je ne pourrai jamais peindre purement de ma tête et ignorer la réalité du monde autour de moi. - Vous m'avez fait réfléchir. Il vaut mieux ne pas en peignant.

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  9. I love your vision, Linda and your expression of that vision, be it in paint, photography or words takes me with you, marvelling, every time.

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    1. Sweet of you to say. I didn't realize I had any particular vision--lamented the lack of it actually. Focus has been my goal last year and this. Portraits and landscapes go well together. One depends on precision; the other is carefree--respond to what you see. Living a life of balances, focus on any one thing becomes tediously boring and requires relief. Landscapes offer that freedom.

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  10. Dear Linda your work looks beautiful and then you touch it ...and it becomes even more beautiful ... Every job is a piece of your life and your world that I admire and in whom I lose myself. And this is the wonder of your Art.

    There is a place where the daffodils grow, a place slightly uphill through a forest that since late last year it was so easy to reach. Now the knee Danilo is no longer able to get in there ... my photos of "yesterday" I have become valuable because maybe will never go back to that place ....

    Simple things can become difficult, but art does not stop at nothing, my dear! Have nice spring days in your beautiful world!Hugs,Rita.

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    1. Dear Rita, You are by far the most accomplished comment writer. The right words just spring from your mind and your heart. Thank you for reminding me of that lovely poem by Wordsworth.

      While my knee did give me a little complaint as I carefully waded into the brush keeping an eye out for snakes, the arthroscope did help a lot. I haven't had to ice at all and whatever quirk of discomfort I've had has been very minimal. I've been able to increase the lengths of my walks too. If he hasn't had one, I would suggest he find out about it and if it applies to his condition. I would also urge him to strengthen his leg muscles. They do support the knee. While I didn't think of it before I headed towards the woods, I should also have reinforced the knee with a support. Balance exercises are good too. I do these on a regular bases at home--also torso strengthening exercises for a stronger back. If the back hurts, it's going to go to the hip right down to the knee and below accompanied sometimes with sciatica, a bitch of a pain in the ass. My words are not as lovely as yours. I wish you and Danilo well.

      My lowest sodium diet is doing wonders. The lightheadedness has decreased considerable. The weight I put on since Chemo treatments four years ago is dropping off, due to the huge decrease in sodium intake and the calories cut from not eating the high sodium, high calorie junk foods I was comforting myself with. The knee bonus of all this is: there's less weight to cart around on a weak leg. Win. Win. Hugs to you too Rita.

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  11. Linda: The doe is absolutely beautiful! The first painting is driving me crazy because it reminds me of a work by a famous artist, but I can't remember by whom. Van Gogh, perhaps. Great stuff!

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    1. Thanks JJ. Let me know if you recall which artist. Being a big fan of Van Gogh, I don't recall any VG painting that looks like this one.

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  12. Erg mooi gedaan met veel sfeer lieve groetjes Danielle

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    1. Thanks Danielle. It's coming along.

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  13. Okay Linda!
    Let me be very clear! I love, love your wild and so very exciting paintings! They are filled with emotion! Daring and dramatic! Cast your fate to the wind! Live for today! Seize the moment! So much more! A thrill for me to enjoy! The colors, the brush strokes, and so much more make this piece a very, very, successful work of art!
    Bravo my art friend!
    (Also love the photographs! That deer is rocking the runway! So good! So good!)
    Take care Linda!
    Your art buddy!
    Michael

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    1. Well aren't you a sweetheart dear man. Come visit any time. Your art buddy back.

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