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Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Second Floor To Your Right

Turn right at the top of the stairs.

Shock of all shocks, you'll  see  a painting in the upstairs hall.
After thirteen years of empty walls, the second floor gallery of the Roth museum sports a painting! Wonders of all wonders.With  drawers and shelves that overflow with drawings and paintings, how could these walls remained empty for so many years? But no longer. We've pierced the surface, future additions should pose no problems with marring the finish of the lush spicy tomato red.


Four Seasons is the second  painting I've done made up of multiple units. The first was Out of the Closet, located in Gallery B, (basement).  I like the concept of units.  I like wall mounted geometry.  Strong connectives are imperative. Four Seasons falls short, other than its title and a few lines and colors that do carry the eye from one painting to the next.  I should have hung it in the studio for final finish, as I did Closet, but the subject needed to be rethought. I realized that somewhere during the painting of Fall.  So, as good as the foursome look, they are not good enough for the main gallery on the first floor.Besides, those bare vertical walls, as high colored as they are, were just screaming  for something to break the monotony--or was that me?



17 comments:

  1. Stunning.

    The red wall highlights the reds in the paintings.

    Out of the Closet is fantastic.

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  2. Beats Four Seasons to death. --I think the paintings became grayed down when hung against the red wall, as I suspected they would. They'd be much better off against white. The colors would maintain their punch. For now, that's where they stay.

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  3. Linda, you really do have a VERY good eye. Four Seasons does indeed look stunning on the red wall, and Closet is so bright, bold and beautiful! Kudos to you!!

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  4. Thanks Kathryn. We're still getting used to it. Ellis keeps saying,"I don't know." And I keep saying, "You have to give it the three days grace period." In the design business, clients would go "well I don't know throughout a renovation project" every time something new happened in their space. I used to say, "Give it three days to settle in." And in three days, it did. Everybody was happy.

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  5. Hola Linda, además de realizar unos cuadros preciosos, eres una gran decoradora de interiores. Un abrazo.

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    1. Gracias Sonia. Ese era mi trabajo al día durante veintitrés años. Me encantó.

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  6. I can see why you put your paintings on the red wall, but (you guessed a 'but' was coming didn't you) they are almost lost on the wall. Your paintings are stunning, they don't need a dramatic colour behind them. (okay, if you never speak to me again I will understand)lol.

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    1. Don't fret Ann. I agree. Before I hung them I knew the red was going to turn them a bluish-greenish gray--it's Johannes Itten's interaction of color. A small gray square on a larger red square will give the appearance of blue green, its complimentary; a small yellow square on a gray wall will make the wall appear to have a purplish tint. This is a fun phenomena. These paintings belong on a white wall--I don't have a one in the house. The lightest, most neutral walls I have are in the living room, a number three gray/taupe, and they are filled up. I still have a lot of the designer in me that won't let me hang a painting unless, a painting is needed in that spot. A painting was needed in the upstairs hall and that one was the one I had that would fill the space.

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  7. It's looking good - love the colours

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    1. My red walls get that a lot. I adore them. They warm my soul and they say a big Welcome to folks who drop by.

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  8. the paintings on that incredible Red wall looks fantastic, Linda!! The color is the color I want but too afraid to have!!! I love it!!!

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    1. Oh jump right in Hilda, the color's fine. My whole entrance hall, which is open to the floor above is this red. (It's actually called Georgian Clay by Pittsburgh Paint, Manor Hall finish). I liken it to Chinese Red, the watercolor. It's warm, not cool. I haven't tired of it in thirteen years. Funny thing though, I never wear red. I don't like the way I look in it. LOL

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  9. I knew it would look great, and it does ! I also think very hard before piercing a wall, so I am not surprised about the red wall being naked for so long.

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    1. Thanks Jane, but a white wall would be better. Ellis hates putting holes in walls, I think nothing of it. I have plenty of filler and the paint I use holds its color; it doesn't fade no matter the age so the touch up matches. I think artists have to be able to hang their work just for observation purposes. In the basement, I do have an observation wall, but unfortunately it's in a finished room. I always have to touch it up. I often hang wet paintings there and sometimes they scuff, or I splatter one quick flick to bring color into that area and it hits the wall as well. That's what I get for letting Honey have his say on what was going to go on in that room: constant maintenance.

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    2. Have you thought about using some of your wall paint in the basement observation room walls or a piece of cardboard--just enough to see what the finished work will look like on the real wall?

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  10. Oooh I really, really like Out of the Closet! Joy and energy expressed! The red wall also made me smile. I asked the Tribal Chief is we could have a wall like that... but he thought that we have too many heat-producing-moving-bodies in the house to add more warmth;-)

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  11. They look elegantly fabulous! The WOW factor is definitely apparent!

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