Sunday, May 20, 2012

My Norman Rockwell Look

My Norman Rockwell Look


Sunday's charcoal wasn't as knock off as Saturday's. The hat threw me. The jowls threw me--actually made me gasp with disbelief.  Who is that woman  in the bucket hat? She must have been having some sort of fishing fantasy, when she bought it.  I  know for a fact she doesn't have a pole. And bating the hook? You've got to be kidding. 

32 comments:

  1. Muito agradável o seu blog, estarei seguindo.
    wwwsabereducar.blogspot.com

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    1. Muito obrigado por se tornar um seguidor. Eu aprecio seu apoio de minha arte. Eu serei mais para visitá-lo em breve.

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    1. Thank you Vicki. I just came from your site and you are quite the busy lady. There are no jowls on your jawline I'll bet. I admire your first sketch, the architectural one. It would make a nice painting.

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  3. This is so excellent - I love the way the line thins and gets thicker in some places. The expression is priceless, and it is such a good self-portrait.

    At first I couldn't figure out why the comparison to Norman Rockwell. Did he where bucket hats? But then I realized - it's the looking over the glasses, isn't it?

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    1. Exactly! I just thought I looked like one of his characters on the cover of Saturday Evening Post.

      It was a fun semi quicky. This one may be framed. As much as I hate to admit it, it's me. A bit quirky.

      How are you doing? Art is such a wonderful outlet. Take advantage of your talent.

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  4. That is a great portrait! And the 'you've got to be kidding' look is so evident on your face! It's wonderful! I'm especially chuckling because that is exactly what I would look like too in that situation!

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    1. Katherine why is it that Diane Keaton looks fetching in these hats and I look like someone with a real bucket on her head. I couldn't stop laughing wearing throughout the day and watching people's reactions. Very amusing.

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  5. So funny and rings so true. The great thing about being one's own model is no worries about whether the drawing is flattering to the model.

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    1. Truthfulness in portraiture is all I know. I like people the way they are. Flattery-- elongating a short neck is not me, removing jowls is the surgeon's job--and then the subject isn't the subject. My opinion could change if I get any good at this. I wouldn't mind making a buck. LOL. --No, not so LOL. For real.

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  6. LOVE THIS PORTRAIT, Linda!!! Excellent charcoal painting..

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    1. thanks Hilda. Charcoal is my favorite get acquainted medium. There's also a fleetingness about the painting, like the subject is going to move any minute. I also like the subtractive feature. It allows me to carve out planes and points. Love my knead.

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  7. Very good portrait, the expression of her face is just perfect! congrat..
    Cheers

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    1. Mari, I don't know what got into me. I bought this hat on some whim. I never wore it till yesterday morning. I don't know what I was thinking when I plopped it on my head, but I proudly went downstairs, stood in front of my husband, said "Ta Da!" and broke out laughing. The hat on definitely had to be recorded.

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  8. You have made a very alive portrait. Amazing, because it is in charcoal, but I find I am waiting for the witty remark to leave your lips.

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    1. Thank you Julie. That is a very kind comment. A portrait that looks like it's going to talk any minute is everything I could hope for from my efforts. Very sweet of you to say.

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  9. Me gusta mucho el retrato, es un rostro muy agradable. Saludos!!

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    1. Gracias Sonia. Lo que solía ser una cara bonita, pero la gravedad ha hecho un cierto cambio. Me imagino que no es a través de cualquiera!

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  10. Linda, I LOVE this sketch. Your eyes and curl of your lips say it all. :) You have captured such a great expression so extremely well! BRAVO!

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  11. Thanks Kathryn. I just got a couple of e-mails from HS chums who say that isn't me. Unfortunately, or fortunately, they still picture the eighteen year old me, not the seventy something edition. Gravity's a bitch. But old friends are the best.

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  12. I can see you've got your eye on me, so I'd better watch what I write! :0)

    You, madam, are one incredibly gifted lady. I'm convinced there's nothing you cannot do (apart from cleaning ovens and baiting hooks).

    One of these days I'm going to have to try these 'things' you are always urging people to do... charcoal for example - can you imagine the mess I would get into? In the meantime I will continue to scratch away paper, with my blinkers nailed in place.

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    1. You always make me chuckle John.

      My oven, said this young guy this afternoon, should be fixed in "seven business days." It seems these ovens blow fuses when they get too hot--like when you're using the self cleaning feature. So I say,"What keeps the oven from over heating so it won't blow a fuse?" He says,"Just luck." Hmmm. It seems I won't be using my oven anymore, since the self cleaner feature seems to be me.

      Charcoal is a mess--but no where near the mess of oil paints or acrylics. It's a good fast study medium.

      I loved the history you gave on The Shambles. Have you thought about a travel to England blog? Your post made me want to come . It might be a good twist Oliver.

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    2. In fact my granddaughter had a website, 'Adventures in London' and she would have been the perfect one to do it - but, no luck with it.

      Fuses that blow when an appliance overheats seems a contradiction in terms ... what's the fuse for then?

      No art today or tomorrow ... it is accounts time for end of period and end of year: I do the accounts for # 2 son's business ... what does he do? He's an accountant ... don't ask! We're that sort of mixed up family!!

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  13. You are too critical with yourself, dear. The only thing I see and adore at this picture are your eyes and their depth. I am so imposed.

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    1. You are right. I can't seem to shake that when it comes to fine art. I am absolutely confident though when it comes to designing three dimensional spaces and building. I feel like a novice here.

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  14. I think it is very well done - eyes full of life, the subtle shadows on the(your)face, the reflection on the glasses, and a unique pose;-) And of course a unique hat that suggests a unique story and person:-) Sometimes it is the suggested story that makes the art! Though here is plenty of great technique that makes the art great as well:-)

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    1. Minnemie, your comment means a lot. You are a wonderful artist who has an abundant skills in portraiture. Your blog header is a knock out. I am an artist come-lately who spent a lot of time drawing people, but never thought of my skill in that area as anything special. This is the first year (out of a lot of years) I'm exploring where I can go with this. I really appreciate your
      very kind words.

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  15. You're awfully good at the charcoal drawing. Looks to me like you can bang these out with your eyes closed..you do make it look easy! Nice work, and I love the fishing hat!

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    1. It was my turn to turn the chicken on the spit. The chicken was taking forever. Bored as hell, I pulled a piece of charred wood from the fire and started to draw lines on the cave floor. The lines became something I wish we had instead of a chicken. I called to the others "Hey, will you look at this, I made a bison!" Everybody gathered round to see. From their excited grunts, I could tell they thought it was pretty good. I've been drawing with charcoal on the floor, the walls and the ceiling ever since. I think I owed my new job to Thor who brought down a bison with his mighty spear the very next day.

      Charcoal was the first drawing medium I was given after a pencil, which I tended to use on its side for a broader stroke. Charcoal performed better. It has been the first thing I reach for whenever I need to do further value study.

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    2. I know ... vandal ... graffiti everywhere. Cave people have gone to the bisons (dogs not yet invented, since I was a lad!

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  16. great sketch and expression linda !

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    1. Thanks Jane. It was fun to do. --The hat was a purchase for fun too.

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