Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Always Chew With Your Mouth Closed

"They arrested that grandmother for murder."
You never know when someone is sneaking candid shots.

"They arrested that grandmother for murder," Honey said.
"I thought they would," said I snapping away. Then I wondered if they'd arrest Honey when he did away with me for harassing him while he was eating? I snapped faster.

My poor guy couldn't even eat his breakfast and read his paper  in peace. I wanted a photo of someone besides myself  for my morning warm up. Honey was it--even though he never stopped chewing.

This charcoal  is a lot more challenging than the last. Yes, he's got his mouth closed, but there's clothing and still life items to deal with--also overhead lighting, (I would have cut it off had I not thought the room going dark would be the last straw and I would be the next headline). I think it's important to get into these things for larger portraits of the candid and not so candid variety. So far, I have managed to mostly side step painting fabric and bric-a-brac,(really till still lifes).  It's time to give those elements a serious look.

What makes charcoal so attractive  is it's an easy additive and subtractive medium. I use my knead eraser as much as I use the vine charcoal.  In this one, I also hunted down my chamois (for background areas) and a stub (for those areas too tiny to get into).   I didn't finish the drawing, but  initially, I didn't intend to. I was just loosening up my arm for the afternoon's session with mouths. After seeing the drawing here though, I will take another shot at it. Honey's arm and hands need work. Those can never be skipped over if people are  your prime subject.

19 comments:

  1. Oh my goodness , this is WONDERFUL! You are going to town with the charcoal right now! I am amazed that this is only a warm-up... for me it would have been the month's greatest accomplishment:-) The right hand does not bother me - my attention went to his face first and then to the left hand holding the paper, to this right sleeve and shirt folds and back to his face. Those places "tells the story" to me:-) But of course, since you went through all the trouble and risk to become a headline with all your snapping... maybe you should finish Honey's hand;-)

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    1. Well, you have five,very active reasons you might not be able to "knock this drawing out." But I have no Coolaid moments to stand between me and the easel. Enjoy not having as many art sessions as you'd like, you will. Thank you for your kind words. Honey's weren't as gracious.

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  2. U crack me up!.. I love charcoal,pencil or ink... This drawing shows a lot of depth and feeling...

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    1. I'm glad. You could use a chuckle I imagine,after the last weeks.

      What can I tell you? I adore annoying the old grouch.

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  3. Ellis looks like he's weathered the wrath of Roth before.

    My granddaughter leant across the table the other day and said to her mother, "Will you eat with your mouth closed ... and stop slouching at the table." She then gave me a knowing look and with a shrug said, "Kids eh!! Who'd have them?"

    Lovely drawing, Linda. I'm really glad you enjoy your arty days ... ovens and baiting lines notwithstanding!

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    1. I should put a fancy fly on that hat or twenty. That would be pretty funny for a gal who only fishes at the fish mongers.

      "The wrath of Roth" comes out of our mouths on a pretty regular basis around here--not with regards to others--but to various irritating happenings that happen in life. After 52 year married, our wrath is over in five. It's a rule. AND NO SULKING! Oops, I hear him eating again. I have to go get my camera.

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  4. Great! I agree with minnemie!:) Best wishes!

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    1. Thank you Robert. Charcoal seems to be a lowly art medium on the fine art blog circuit, but it's my favorite reach for for quick impressions. Best wishes to you too.

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  5. Nice flow across the page--well done!

    With your focus, you are progressing rapidly.

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    1. Thanks. I think that flow between the curve of his seated body and the newspaper is what made me reach for the camera.

      I like this focusing thing, but one has to lighten it up. Charcoal lightens up oil painting as does an occasional twenty minute landscape. With one, I'm a whiz. With the other I'm a dolt. --But I got a new brush, a large filbert, natural bristle, bought a two hour basic oil painting DVD and signed up for a workshop at the end of the summer. Cost a fortune. This lady had better have some tips I can use. I think of it all as fortification.

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  6. You are hilarious and I am grateful for it. What a combination wit AND talent.

    You make it look easy, but capturing the correct stance as he is resting more on the front arm...I know is not. Great piece.

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    1. Thank you. I try to find humor wherever I can Julie. Life is so serious most of the time, one needs to balance it with humor to create a fine composition.

      Thank you again. I may have had only one painting class in my life, but many, many life drawing classes with charcoal as the main medium and a few figurative sculpture classes. The stance of the model, weight distribution, center of gravity was as important as knowledge of anatomy.

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  7. Hola Linda. Tienes muchas destreza con el carboncillo. Un abrazo!

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    1. Gracias Sonia. He dibujado con carbón vegetal durante toda mi vida. Fue el primer marcador que alguien me dio cuando se dieron cuenta de que podía dibujar. un abrazo de vuelta.

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  8. yeah, confession...I am a crime/trial watcher (so I know exactly which grandmother you refer to!) I like this drawing. Do you print out the photo or just work directly from your ipad? Your drawing skill is admirable. :)

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    1. I work mostly from photos. I noticed early one life doesn't stand still. LOL. Even when painting plein air, it's a good idea to take a few shots to stop the ever changing light. As old fashioned as it sounds, in plein air situations, a Poleroid would be the best camera to have on hand--immediate hardcopy. LOL. I haven't come close to mastering finger painting on the iPad. Tried it last night while watching TV--Very fast sketches of TV personalities/characters. You have to be very quick.

      Photographing Ellis, I set the camera to continuous shots. He never stopped going through the many motions of eating and paper reading. He likes to pretend I'm not there--and actually that's the best for catching the best candid. LOL

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  9. A great scene wonderfully rendered, he looks so peaceful sitting there reading his morning paper .

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    1. Honey is anything but peaceful when he reading his paper. He's gathering all the news so he can pass it on to me. He's also ignoring me and whatever I'm chattering about. He's deeply involved in a responsible adult activity. I, on the other hand, am irresponsible and never read the papers UNLESS, there's something interesting that catches my eye as I stare at the back of his LOL. I get my news passing by the TV when the news is on. Most of it is so depressing--like the grandmother who shot her grandkid once, then again, the killing shot, while he was on the phone calling for help. She wasn't using a camera.

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