Monday, April 23, 2012

Okay, One More App Tryout: Lucus Asketch

Lucus,  A combination of  iPad drawing Apps using first Asketch
for the charcoal drawing, then Brushes for color and line.
Okay, finally, I doodled a guy--still with long lean face--but male.  The lights and darks are jumbled, the hat visor could be better formed and he hardly has an ear, but once again I was concentrating on how to manipulate the tools in Asketch, then transfer over to use the tools in Brushes. I tried to write my name, but it came out sloppy, similar to my dad's signature, which was extremely easy to forge on report cards I didn't care to show anyone.

Now don't tell me that once I get a grip on it. The iPad isn't a great sketchpad for working out ideas without dragging out a lot of  stuff.

Now who is Lucus? Damned if I know. But if I was to guess:  He's the guy who lives down in the hollar in a broken down cabin with a front yard littered with the carcasses of dead farm machinery.  He owns a large herd of cattle branded  with a swastika, who roam freely in the foothills of the Sierra mountains.You don't want to get in his way. I hear he has some tattered white sheets tucked in his crawl space--so you certainly do not want to put a mezuzah on your door-post. The guy's a loner and doesn't cotton to strangers of any persuasion.  The speed limit through the hollar  is 25mph, but I would suggest strongly you drive by quickly.

And there my children is another free association iPad drawing along with a crock of fiction from L.W.R.
Happy painting on the real stuff. 

12 comments:

  1. You are a star and you do make me laugh, Linda.

    What exactly is a 'hollar?' I'm guessing 'hollow' ...yeah?

    You certainly love all this don't you? You never stop.

    (No cream or sugar, as it comes, please, steaming hot.)

    It's really interesting to me, because it would never occur to me to do the clever things you do. I don't draw faces when I doodle ... I do machine parts in isometric ... I know that's boring. But life would be boring if we all did the same things.

    These days I'm putting pen straight to paper and using the pencil less and less. However, I think that's more to do with impatience than art :0)

    I think the only time I'm really 'arty' is when I'm writing - the characters really do take over in my fiction.

    I started off drawing a tramp-steamer and ended up drawing a view of Richmond Castle. It's in Yorkshire, I'm considering doing the blurb in a Yorkshire dialect ... DH Lawrence wise; for example: "Thysen" = your self, and "Thee'l get owt fer nought" = you won't get anything for nothing.

    Blimey! Linda ... I'm taking over your blog ... sorry!

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    1. Feel free. That's the absolute last iPad sketching app exploration I'll do. I have learned enough to use it as a quick sketch device. Now I'm back to finish off the baby and send the two on their way--maybe a couple of watercolors to kill some drying time?

      Do you use Koh-i-noor Rapidograph pens or similar? I used them exclusively when doing my architectural plans, elevations and the occasional perspective drawing for people who didn't have a clue what they were looking at. I never used the computer for such; the clients loved the touch of the artist. Couldn't take their hands off the vellums. I miss that precise type of drawing, but this is my time to loosen up, which is exactly what I'm doing--with hopefully a successful watercolor this afternoon...

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  2. This Lucus came out quite well, I see people who start painting with the Ipad really get hooked !

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    1. Jane, I'm not hooked; I'm curious about how things work--particularly if they have a connection to generating interests in the arts from the young. These apps do.

      I don't know if they have Etch-a-Sketch in Italy, but it was one of my favorite toys as a kid--and my children liked it too. These apps are the new and improved generation of that simple toy, but with greater tools than a stylus. These kind of apps can get youngsters drawing, at first mechanically, then for real on real paper with real paints.

      It's a computer world, we have to accept that, explore it and use it to promote more traditional approaches, the joy of hand-made.

      I never did my designing on a computer. I tried it once and it took me a whole morning to round a wall in a bathroom! I didn't like the mechanical look of the finished plans and elevations. I didn't like the look of the perspectives. I stuck with my pencils, vellum pads, T-square, right angle, compass and scale. Client's could not take their hands off of the actual drawings.

      People love the touch of the artist. We have nothing to worry about, but we should be familiar with what going on. I'm getting familiar.

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  3. Linda, I don't find him menacing... I love the lines, texture and colors u used... he almost looks like a cartoon character.... not the typical cartoon, more of an upscale look... His eyes are the giveaway.

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    1. Me neighter, but it was the eye that made me make up the story. I was interested in cartooning for a while there. Went so far as to design a main character, then got busy reshaping people's interiors for their changing lifestyles--in other words making money.LOL

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  4. You ARE having a darn good time with that, aren't you!!!

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    1. I am. I am fascinated with it--and there is is on the side table next to the couch, so much more interesting than watching TV, and easier on the feet than standing at the easel an hour or two longer.

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  5. Your story does match that visual! I love the plaid. I don't have an ipad (yet). I have always been a mac person, so I suspect one day that I will get one. One of the painters I know takes it plein air painting and he photographs the scene and refers to it when the light changes (to remind him what the original idea was!) Pretty clever. I love your ipad sketches. Your signature looks good to me!

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    1. Well I could have him more haggard and less rosy, but the eye does it--and the hat and the scruffy beard. --Plus I really do like creative writing. In fiction, the first thing you do is design your character's personalities. Lucus has a rough one. LOL.

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  6. Your art work "speaks for itself" and it "says' marvelous things. It is everything I love about art, emotional, exciting, colorful, unique, and so much more. Thank you so much for your uncompromising art!
    Your newest art buddy,
    MIchael

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  7. This is great Linda, i bet you had a lot of fun with this. Great random shapes and vibrant blending color, even if it is an ipad. LOL :{>

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