Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Roth/Wright Two Hour Portrait Pact


Beanie Girl, oil, 9" x 12", Two hour oil portrait challenge

SHARON WRIGHT and I have made a pact: to paint one oil portrait a week in just two hours.  This is my first attempt at increasing my speed of capturing a likeness, establishing a palette and mixing  right-on values in a  very short period of time.  My California children were visiting this week, naturally I snapped a photo of Erin for the reference.  The two hour sketch falls short of finish by a stroke or two, but when I reached the two hour deadline my brush came off the canvas and went into the MS for cleaning.  Fun stuff-- like my thirty minute morning drawing sessions. I'm looking forward to gaining a keener eye with regards to color values and brushstroke placement. I am also hoping the challenge will renew my diminishing enthusiasm for painting, My competitive nature, my skill in portraiture and primarily my age are discouraging: so little time and so many more portraits to paint to attain satisfaction. 
 
 

10 comments:

  1. Linda, it's fantastic! I hope the challenge re-kindles your passion. I want to see more!!!

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    1. I hope so too. I had a houseful of family the last ten days, but still managed to find two quiet hours to sneak off to the studio after snapping a shot of my granddaughter and printing the reference. This week, I'm dashing off Sharon's husband Roy from a photo she shot just before he shaved off his beard--probably because he was so paintable too many female artists were after him to sit. :-)) Today will probably be the day; the house emptied out on Monday and was put back in order yesterday; the way to the studio is clear.

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    2. Have a wonderful time in the studio painting that handsome beard!

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    3. I'm not relaxed enough with oils to have a wonderful time. I haven't quite zeroed in on an application that suits my impatient nature. ;-)) Hopefully, this challenge will reveal which method is the most natural and comfortable.

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  2. Go, Linda, Go!!!! This is a fabulous start. Just a stroke or two from finish indeed. Now, are you putting up a photo of Ellis for me?

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    1. No. He didn't shave his beard--actually, he never grew one, yet two of our three sons have one. I picked up on this today, the day after we got the house back in order from the kids' visit. I'm going to post Roy now. He's not quite your Roy, but I noticed I freed up a lot sooner on this one than with Erin. I also mover to a small format, 6I don't think an absolute finish is necessary either. Detailed finishes are not a necessity using the gestural method, thee only method appropriate for this challenge..

      You will never see Ellis on FB; he's asked me to never show any photographs of him. Sorry.

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  3. What a great idea to encourage each other like this! Can't wait to see the beard! ;)

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    1. We haven't gone public with this challenge yet; would you be interested? Roy's beard didn't get the attention it needed. I was too busy concentrating on his eyes. I totally winged Erin's eyes. I guess I was making up for that when I dashed off Roy today? Still finding my way.

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    2. Of course watercolor is such a different technique, but I would love to paint more portraits and figures. But I need to start with sketching.... daily.

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    3. I had the best time doing my 30 minute pencil drawings over this last winter first thing in the morning, (six thirty , seven o'clock), sitting in front of the SAD light with a cup of coffee. They helped sharpen my eye for the important points and dimensions that made a particular person that person. If the drawing required more than thirty minutes, I worked on it again the next morning. I didn't have to finish in one session. I'll probably end up doing the same thing here. Like watercolors, oils could use some drying time in between details if a complete finish is necessary. But here a tight finish isn't necessary--just a quick, gestural impression. Try it wet into wet with a blow dryer for taming the bleeds and runs.

      What I like is the exercise got me going again. I was really getting overwhelmed. I have this ambition to excel that really gets out of hand sometimes. I'd love to actively market my work and possibly make some money, but I haven't the energy that that demands. After years of working, I caught the if-it-doesn't-make-money-what-good-is-it illness and that along with age made me depressed. While I was working, my art was just my art, something I did From time to time to escape. Retired and working at my art daily it became a JOB, something I should get paid for doing. I have to put that into perspective and get back to playing with my art, not taking it too seriously. This exercise may will help. The short period of time makes it play and fun again. I guess I think artists are fine instruments. Highly sensitive and always in need of fine tuning. i'm fine tuning.

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