Monday, March 16, 2015

Too Cocky. Not Enough Measuring. Amature Work..

A Disaster in graphite; 6 x 8, TMDD Series, 2015

Harsh criticism for someone who should have known better.  Too cocky and not enough measurement notes about sums up what went wrong this morning--and as soon as I opened my mouth about taking all those life drawing classes who needs any more of them! How egotistical can one be? 

 But at least I know where I cut corners:  I didn't match up strategic points.  Note the vertical midline that starts at his ear lobe and passes through his sternum, the groin and the outside of his ankle. My midline was noted and drawn too late. I am about one quarter inch off on the placement of that leg. The bottom of his right hand cupping the edge of the chaise sets the bottom of the calf on his left leg. I really should have dissected the reference.  My ego got the better of me.

--And my errors go on:   I am also off on the other one for both his feet end at the horizontal line across the bottom of the page.  This drawing is a disaster that wouldn't have happened had I followed my own advice to measure relationships and match points initially and  periodically throughout a drawing.  This guy's pose is worthy of a do over though-not in graphite on a small sheet of paper, but in charcoal on a larger format where a gestural stroke has the room to be gestural.    

10 comments:

  1. It boils down to being human.. humans are imperfect... btw, u are pretty harsh on yourself, then again, maybe that's why I enjoy your watercolors and drawings... is it just the portraits that need to be exact and uniform? or are your watercolors fall into the same measuring? To the untrained/uneducated eye, I don't see the imperfections.. you have taught me a lot about drawing.. wish I could attempt to achieve what u have.

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    1. No, those are carefree paintings. Most of us don't care if a pot of flowers isn't exactly as it is, In fact, we like distortions better; they're more interesting. Not so with realistic figure drawing. I don't think criticizing my work honestly is being too hard on myself. I know I can do better, It takes self confidence to publicly lambast a poor piece of work. It doesn't help me, i.e.the next piece,, to accept my own sloppiness. on this one. Note: I did not tear the offending drawing out of my sketch book. It is an excellent example of what not to do again. :-))

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  2. You didn't mean to but you gave me a great start to my day.
    I saw the heading "Too Cocky" and then scrolled down to see the circled area. What a riot. Look at the highlighted area on his shorts!!!!
    My hubby is still rolling on the floor... I guess we have smutty minds.
    Dear, dear Linda. Thank you. I know you don't mind me sharing this wonderful happenstance...or maybe a freudian slip?

    On a serious note. I see exactly what you are saying and kudos for sharing.

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    1. It's funny how the subconscious puts words in our heads that spill pricelessly onto the page. Pointing that out gave me a much needed chuckle. Thanks.

      I think sharing our failures along with our successes is of great value. Sometimes failures come one right after the other and can kill the drive, cause blocks. It's important to know that failure is the way forward. There was a gal who came to the group I was in who wanted to learn how to draw. When attempt after attempt failed to produce anything she considered decent,, she quit and went on to take a class in jewelry making where I guess drawing isn't necessary? I believe that drawing is a prerequisite to design too. It was my drawing ability that allowed me to go into design where I made a good living. If you can draw you can turn that skill towards any art oriented discipline. All forms start with a sketch, a concept drawing, sometimes quite a few of them. I ran into that gal a year later and she showed me the jewelry she made. It was uninspired. Playing around with clay would have been helpful to her too.

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  3. You are not alone!!! I have, several times [many times???], made errors in proportion and perspective, in a "finished" drawing for a painting, and not noticed that something was strangely off till I was half-way though the painting. Don't be too harsh on yourself :)
    Kathryn

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    1. It's cockiness and laziness that causes us the pain of failure. Thank God I realize that! I'm obviously becoming a bit forgetful in my Golden years. :-))

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  4. This time, a bigger smile.

    About the drawing, I use the mirror reflection to let me know how off my proportions are. Not that I always correct, but, then, I am not aiming for portraiture or even realism.

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    1. When painting, I do that too. These morning sketches are just warm up, free hand, as few tools as possible, practice sessions. My eye did catch the errors and I knew exactly why I made them. That's when I pulled out my straight edge and started checking. It should have been out when I started. Like I said, 'cocky.' Cockiness is NOT next to Godliness. :-))

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  5. Definitely way too hard on yourself. Tomorrow, another day, another drawing. I enjoyed the 'too cocky' to.

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    1. That's what Ellis said and he never has a comment. He thinks the drawing is good. I think I should give it another try knowing what I know from this one.

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