Friday, March 13, 2015

Frida, A Second Look

Frida, A Second Study, Graphite, 6 x 8, TMDD Series, 2015
 I could have used a few more minutes than thirty. I could have used some new batteries in my camera.  But time is short this morning. Our reservation at the exhibit is at eleven and there's the decision to make of what colorful, arty outfit I will wear to one of my most favorite places on the planet?  I kid you of course, a museum trip is all about comfortable shoes.  The ones I can do the most walking in are my Pumas--so what goes on my back, goes with my Pumas.  But, I'm babbling. This woman was beautiful, one eyebrow or not.  I can see the passion behind the beauty Diego fell in love with.

On another topic:  Over the last year I've been keeping a ledger of all my art expenses--supplies, books, membership fees, exhibition fees.  Yesterday, a year after I started the ledger, I tallied the score. Between March 8th, 2014 and March 12th,2015, I spent $3,108.62 on my 'hobby.'  That's a pretty penny for a retiree--pretty enough to make me think I might want to get out into the marketplace? Note that none of my expenditures concerned framing, acid free backing, mat board or non-glare glass (the glass I prefer for works on paper).   Have any of you dared to tally how much your passion costs per year? 

8 comments:

  1. Is this your version of Frida Khalo? if it is indeed Ms. Khalo, that is one woman I admire.. her strength and integrity... as far as passion- mine is reading... my oldest keeps trying to get me to buy a Kindle every time she sees the mountain of books stacked... I can't seem to do that since I like the feel of turning pages...

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    1. The reference for this sketch and yesterday's sketch were taken from Bing Images. Go take a look for yourself. I chose two sienna photographs that were taken early in her life. Both of my renderings are good likenesses. Her own portraits, in my opinion, were harsh. She was a woman who didn't like herself. That was the opinion I left the house with this morning--and it's definitely my opinion after seeing the Rivera/Kahlo exhibit at the DIA. She had poor (the work of both Kahlo and Rivera struck me as primitive with regards to technique). Her autobiographical self portraits were a pictorial journal. Women hold her in esteem because we all know we haven't quite achieved the same status as the male gender. Her work speaks to that inequality, which was greater then than now, and the suffering it causes. I like books too, but painting more; it's personal, it's physical, It's expressive. I guess if I was a writer, I would be more passionate about literature?

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  2. Hi Linda! Great try at Frida's portrait! I wouldn't dare checking how much I spend an my two greatest hobbies: painting ( including drawings, waterpaintings,acrylic.oil, etc ) and books. Even if I do all the secondhand book stores I still spend a fair amount of money every year. Better that I don't know...otherwise, I'd have to cut somewhere and that's definitely not " the plan ". :) Take care, Hugs

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    1. My renditions are accurate likenesses. Kahlo was prettier than she painted herself. go to Bing Images and look at the actual photos I used as references. she did not have a pointed chin or tiny eyes--though she was small of stature.. The last self portrait in the exhibit was titled, "Ugly." It looked like the first sketch I did that I posted yesterday. This woman really didn't like herself--probably because she was barren? Barren women in 1932-36, were failures. The bus accident she was in as a girl was the reason behind her poor health and childlessness. she did think she was a better painter than Rivera--and she was in a self-absorbed, mentally anguished way.

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  3. Great drawing, gentler than yesterdays. And no, wouldn't dare keep a tally.......it is, however a very good idea.

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  4. Thanks. She was older in the reference I used this morning; more into her looks than the fifteen or sixteen year old I sketched yesterday. Her hair is coifed. --Keeping track of how much painting costs enables more realistic pricing if you're actively pursuing sales. If it's a hobby and you're living on a fixed income, then it's a good idea too. If you're working and earning lots of disposable income, it's nice to know how much you can dispose or that you don't have to think about it at all. :-)) I am, unfortunately, a curious Capricorn who has fits of being practical on a regular basis. I'm trying to give that up.

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  5. If you can sell without framing, just matting, it is much less expensive. Also lets buyer chose frame they like.

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    1. I think so too. Framing or 'ready to hang' is required for artwork to be shown in exhibitions from what I've heard. I paint on gallery stretched canvases 1 1/2" thick. I paint the sides and hang them as is. I don't like pictures that turn And continue over the stretcher bars. They look odd in profile. I use a solid color paint in a coordinated, very dark shade.

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