Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Taking a Tiny Painterly Break

Cold Cereal, 6" x 6", Alla Prima Oil

Enough with Burnt Umbra!  I needed to put color back on the palette.  I did just that. I  took a painterly break and experimented alla prima with small.  Small is difficult--not the painting, but keeping the little canvas still on the easel.  It needs to be propped up to clear the ledge and locked down to withstand a frisky brush stroke.  Cudos to you who do this all the time. 

It was delightful painting from life--even if it was Ellis' dirty dishes.

24 comments:

  1. A beautiful dance of gestural brushstrokes, those that the viewer feels like they are made by the painter. I am delighted !!! Even the dirty dishes Ellis can be art in your hands !!!

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    1. Thanks Rita. It was such a pleasure to let go. I've got two more 6 x 6s in stock, mistakes I made when ordering. They are fine for days like today when I just couldn't stand one more tedious minute with Burnt Umbra. As far as Ellis's dirty breakfast dishes, I do like still life's that aren't set up. Day to day life cannot be set up. Meanwhile, I have constructed a stage for still lifes. It still needs some work, but it will be ready after the holidays. My stage today, was the kitchen counter. :-))

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  2. Even in such a small work we see your passion, exuberance, joy in what you do. Dirty dishes! What next?

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    1. Thanks Sharon. What next? Dirty dishes are forever.

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  3. What a shot in the arm! Love the color and the way it looks larger than 6x6in painting.
    Yes, I agree...your personality comes across as more suited to the informal "set-up".
    What a difference from the formal (and beautiful) portrait for the class you are taking. I like the smaller one of Erin
    for its wit and sparkle - which I associate more with you. You can turn your hand to anything
    of the

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    1. It was a shot in the arm! Trouble is I think I need a few more. I need more fun and less grueling. The Venetians took painting way too seriously. Thanks Julie.

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  4. And with the color comes a freeing of the brushwork and an outpouring of energy! You know I love this, Linda!

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    1. Yes! Scumbling went out the window. Six by six is an uncomfortable size, but the smallness of it kept me from getting carried away. I'll do that tomorrow--8 by 8, or 10 x 10? Trouble is: Ellis has cold cereal every morning. :-))

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  5. Bonjour chère amie,

    Une adorable petite peinture d'un délicieux moment de plaisir de la vie. J'aime beaucoup les nuances de couleurs.
    Gros bisous ☼

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    1. Thanks Martine. I chose the most limited of palettes and really didn't disguise the primaries too much. As it happened those were the colors in Ellis's favorite cereal bowl.

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  6. Ellis' dishes.....nice! I love the color.

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    1. Paint from life! Dirty dishes are very life-like. It is a subject most artists would walk right by. Not me. There they were all set up on the kitchen counter. II didn't need to do a thing but get out the paints. Linda's found objects series. :-))

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  7. Linda, you made such a mundane subject into a superb painting!!!!! It's gorgeous! Beautiful painterly strokes and colors - I LOVE it! You must have had a blast painting it :)
    Kathryn

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    1. I DID!!! Patience is the key to the Venetian technique. I have just so much. After that's gone, I have to play. The Venetian technique in the 16th and 17th century was a very different matter. Then, it was a technique practiced by a number of artisans working together under a master painter. There were several hands from several people on the paintings and the master would come in to do the big finish. Now, it's just me--or whoever else decided to find out what this was all about. My patience fell short. Plus there was the over sized canvas, the resurfacing of the already difficult parking lot and yesterday, I found another complaint: the noxious odor of Yellow Ochre Burnt, a color made authentically in Holland that gives you a high as soon as the top is unscrewed. The color is darn close to Raw Sienna, so darn close, I would never insist upon the one from Holland that takes your breath away and makes you think of putting on your mask!

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  8. I also think it is difficult to squeeze all the stuff you want into a small canvas without it looking too crowded , but this is beautiful and very harmonious. Love the colors too !

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    1. I know what you mean. This was on the brink. One thing is not enough, however, and two is too even up. So three: for the Father, The Son and The Holy Ghost. Three is a lucky number--for still life item as well as how many potatoes to buy at the market. :-)). Yesterday, I upped the number of items, but also the size of the canvas to nine inches,--or three times three! Thank you Jane. I did have a lovely time. Then yesterday, I got serious again and the results were up tight. You'll see what I mean next post.

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  9. Hi Linda! I'm back! I tried using 6 x 6 canvas, but not for long- I'm too impatient.

    It'll take me a week or so to get up to speed, but it is a relief to find my friends are still here, inspiring!!

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    1. Well hello there! I was just thinking about you the other day. I wondered if you were settled in your new castle on the sea? Good to hear from you. Tell me about a lack of patience. I am suffering from it. The Venetian Technique did me in. I'm taking a short--or long--leave? Six by six is too small for me too. Today, I upped the size. I do not understand 'table art,' paintings that are so small you can't see them till you knock them off the table top easel setting down your glass of wine. I'm near sighted. I need size and high contrast. For a day's play, however, small is good--if you don't mind your hand cramping from holding the brush like a pencil. I hope to see more of your outstanding work soon. Glad you're well.

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  10. Excellent piece......Ellis' dirty dishes worked beautifully!!! I like the texture in this painting....nice work, Linda!!!!!

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    1. Thanks Hilda. It was a relief painting. I do have to go larger than this though.

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  11. Better painting them than washing them! :) Great painting!

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    1. ABSOLUTELY! Yesterday, in preparation for our up coming holiday, I had to IRON! You might see an iron and the board here next. :-))

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  12. I have a solution to the little canvas moving - use some Pres-stick / Blue-tack (whatever the sticky stuff is called where you are) and stick the small canvas or panel to it.
    Now it will behave and stay in place for you.
    So enjoy the spontaneous quality to this little gem.

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    1. Great idea. I never came close to thinking of sticking it to something like a thicker stretched canvas. What I found myself doing was turning the canvas around instead of coming at it straight forward, but that didn't start till I was into it. Painting small and loose is a lot messier than tight and large. I really enjoyed the mess after all that tight. --Not that I'm through with that, the technique has a place. I'm resting. Refilling my cup.

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