Thursday, September 25, 2014

Contour Done. Wash Next; The Venetian Technique

Finished!
I  finally finished the contour.  I stopped short of contouring my abstract painting in the background on the left (facing).  I may or may not put the painting in; I'll decide if that plane needs breaking up when I get into color.  While the painting sat drying, I took a step of my own. I did a nine step gradation chart of Burnt Umbra, the color I will be using for the monochrome.  I thought this was a good idea given the range of values in the drapery in the background and the window casing.  This painting has all the trial and tribulations I could ask for:  skin tones, hair, folds in fabric, architectural elements.  There's all degree of edges to contend with. But before I get to solving those problems, I have to cover the canvas with an even wash.  Todd called that something fancy, but the word went right by me. The wash gets done tomorrow so it will have two days to dry before I have to tote this canvas back to class where I will be up with the other new kid.

NOTE:  A great product to have for keeping brushes fit to form:  Da Vinci Gum Arabic.  Since reading Schmid and buying the quality brush Todd recommended, I've been treating my brushes with the respect they deserve.  This stuff keeps their shape as shapely as the day I got them.  Love it!!

21 comments:

  1. Het gaat echt super Helen ben zo benieuwd lieve groetjes Danielle

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  2. Sorry ik noemde je bij de verkeerde naam volgens mij is het Linda toch lieve groetjes Danielle

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    1. Not to worry Danielle I've done that myself. I've called Victor, Peter--or Peter, Victor? I was looking at too many posts at the same time. Thanks Danielle. It was a pleasure painting in the last line. I am looking forward to painting in the wash tomorrow and will probably post that too for folks following the procedure. Meanwhile, I am also trying to finish Henry off. I asked the teacher if he worked on multiple paintings. He said no. I understand why. I got intense upon getting to the next phase and did ignore Henry till I got to the point of watching paint dry.

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    2. You speak Dutch??? (I'm guessing it's Dutch)

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    3. Bing Translation. Like nearly all my countrymen, I am lack an ear for foreign languages. Shame on us!

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  3. What a beautifully done value chart. WOW! I admire it because I know it is not easy to achieve the middle range of subtle changes.
    I am thinking you may be doing a middle value stain over the drawing, but definitely not sure. Find out the correct term ,please Linda, inquiring minds want to know.

    We are all doing value charts and full value underpaintings at the Artists Guild this month - only we are using black to white.
    Glazing color over the underpainting follows next month. Magic before our very eyes.

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    1. Thanks. I watched Todd show the other beginner how to lay out the monochrome palette. He put out three equal dabs of white and two dabs of Burnt Umbra. Then he mixed a midtone. After that, I walked away. I figured I had to get that far first. Now I'm there. I decided, (after my Schmid five step color charts), nine was more like what I see. so I put white at one end of the line, burnt umbra at the other, mixed a half and half midtone in quantity and worked towards the darkest and the lightest from the middle. I feathered the delineation.

      'Local color' follows the monochrome in the Venetian Technique. I'm looking forward to that--I signed up for the class for that information. To me local color means the middle tone of the color in the reference, but I made that up. I'd love it if someone would tell me how to determine the midtone. I see a lot of values when I look at subjects. I'd love a 'rule' that told me which ones to eliminate. I also could use some guidance on mixing glazes. :-)).

      Sounds like we're doing the same thing. --I did an Ivory Black and white chart and thought Ivory black was too blue. Mars black seems to be 'warmer.' I have not charted it yet though. I don't think we ever reach a point where we know it all.


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    2. Cassel Earth by La Franc is a beautiful black. No blue to it like Ivory Black. Easy to bend warm or cool.

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  4. I'm following with great interest - and wondering would I have the patience?

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    1. You pay for the class, you have the patience. :-))

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    2. That reply was a bit flippant . Sorry Carol. I while doing the contour made me anxious after a summer plus painting in my usual gestural fashion, I felt suddenly relaxed once I accepted this method is one of slow, calculated consideration. I enjoyed the change of pace.

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    3. Linda, sometimes flippant works... And sometimes a complete slow-down is needed to really look and take care with what one is painting.

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    4. You're absolutely right. Actually the old masters often combined techniques--like this one and wet-into-wet, Alla Prima.

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  5. This drawing is absolutely amazing, Linda! Now the fun begins....! I hope you will be posting the progression of this painting for us to see!

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    1. Thanks Hilda. I hope is comes out as terrific as your portraits. I'm still dickering If I should contour my large painting that's in the background?
      It's warm in color and the room is cool; . All of that area on the left , warm or cool is #7 or 8 dark values. All I'd be doing is breaking up the plane and putting in a very muted repeat of a squiggly pattern that repeats the (OMG) wrinkles in my hand. I think I just talked myself into it....
      This method of painting construction,does make you visualize what the painting with look like finished. The slow pace encourages planning ahead and questioning the value of this and that element. Happenstance is not part of this procedure. Good and not so good.

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  6. Linda, this really is a wonderful contour drawing. I am very much looking forward to seeing the progression of this work!
    Kathryn

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    1. Thanks Kathryn. It's very slow going. The directive is to put everything you might want to use in the contour right now. I am having difficulty with that. I don't understand why I can't decide the amount of detail I want to include at some other step in the process. I am also having trouble with putting in the wash. The canvas is big. The recommended brush is small. I have never brushed in an overall wash. I've always used a rag, yet the other students who have taken this class before, have washes that look incredibly even. Tomorrow will tell. I'm going to use a 4" bristle brush to apply the wash--then a rag. Four inches seems the right size for this size canvas--then wipe and wipe again till the entire surface is evenly covered. I do not think new students are properly informed. The teacher assumes everyone has done this before. As far as the contour goes, I have no problems drawing, never have.

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  7. Oh my, the contour drawing is looking awesome! Can't wait to see the next step. Very exciting~!

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  8. Can't wait to see the rest!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)

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  9. This is so interesting, and like everybody else, I'm keen to see what comes next !

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  10. Thanks Celeste, Helen and Jane. I can't wait to get to the next phase either.. First, however, this still needs lines, then a wash. By Monday, I should be ready to start the monochrome. I imagine the monochrome will take some time. It's in this stage and the two more after that,that I hope to get the most out of this class--greater skill handling the brushes and the paint. To keep you all interested, I'll have to work in some direct painting. :-))

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