Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Pardon My Dust

At long last, my new wall with an "In Progress" observation/drying  ledge.
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With Schmid, Swatland and Wilcox laid to rest in my library, my bed rest was disturbed at the crack of dawn by Ellis yelling, "Linda, get up!  The carpenters will be here in an hour to build your wall."  I jumped out of bed panicked. Every art supply I own was lined up in front of that wall and needed to be moved out of harms way. Ellis said relax, the guys will move everything, but I couldn't. Only I touch my stuff. Instant headache. Mumbling something about killing my contractor for no advance notice, I stomped downstairs to clear the way for progress.  While I thought clearing the site would take days, it actually took fifteen minutes. The construction of the wall and moving the electrical that was smack dab in the middle of my color wall took Dave and Steve three hours when they waved good bye, this phase of my project done.

Steve installing the sill plate.
It then took me another fifteen minutes to get things back where they belonged. What was the big deal?

Well, the big deal is I'm not really done.  I'm in the process of putting together a glass palette 30" x 20" (I'm waiting for the glass to be tempered).  And  I'm thinking of hanging a full size, wall mounted mirror opposite the easels for checking out compositions. Constructing a  backed  platform stage mounted on a tri-pod for still lifes, so I can paint from life, when driving to an open figurative studio session is out of the question due to weather, isn't a bad idea either. On casters.  It wasn't easy moving my shoe set up out of harm's way and back again undisturbed.



Additional tools for easier painting are: 1) A couple of bulletin boards mounted under that ledge for pinning up reference photos a good squinting distance away from the easel; 2)  storage space for finished work; 3) a ventilation fan for applying varnishes and fixatives; 4)  photographic space.   --Unfortunately, natural light from a glazed area, is undoable being that my studio is located below ground level, but  I'm not too upset by this shortcoming.  Incandescent lighting is prevalent in most people's homes and painting by it has been fine.
Reading Schmid, Swatland and Wilcox has ignited strong interest in developing  clean, controlled work habits in a well organized workspace. My new wall was  a good start.


A well organized workspace helps to make painting less of a struggle and more of a joy.  Lots of practice in that space is what  makes a fine painter.---L.W.Roth 





 

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8 comments:

  1. I absolutely agree. A pleasant workspace seems to motivate us to perform better. What a great start!

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    1. It might not get any better than this. I don't intend to invest a lot of money in a lot of fancy frills. That time was before I installed cabinetry and my fabulous extra deep sink with a built-in washboard perfect for deep cleaning brushes. This is a piecemeal project that I'm feeling out as necessity dictates. The lighting is good, photography floods clipped onto the I-beam. There's a freezer for storing a loaded palette overnight. There's adequate wall space now . I'm satisfied. The rest of the stuff to add is incidental to the main activity. Make the space too done, and the requirement for neatness may become over-bearing? It is a workspace and accidents do happen; furnishings should not be too precious.

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  2. It's going to be a fantastic work area!

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  3. SLOWLY. Next: a mirror, bulletin board and glass palette--improvements in increments. The space worked as it was, but needed some adjustments to accommodate tools that facilitate the craft.

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  4. Looking good, Linda. You made me think I need to rejig my Space!

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    1. "They say" a conscientious enterprise improves their working space in some way every year. At least that is how it is in the custom designed cabinetry business. I should think that an artist has to make production easier on themselves the same way. Your studio set up was inspirational in my making improvements. I was really jealous of your observation/drying ledge.

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  5. You're making me want to re-design my art room, Linda!!! ...I have a small room which could really need some shelves...hmmm! Painting in an organized space makes it so enjoyable! Your art room looks wonderful already!!!

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    1. Thanks Hilda. It's nothing fancy--just an eleven by thirteen foot room, now a little more finished, in the basement. I'll keep adding things as I think I need them. Fancy it will never be. That would make me too up tight about spills and such that do happen as you back up and knock into the stool with your coffee on it! I must admit however, that after the rough wall went in, I started thinking about a laminate wood floor. Laminate cleans up terrific. With just a little elbow grease I can get my laminate cabinet sink run looking like new. The mistake I made was to let Elis choose my faucet. He got a white plastic one that acrylic paint stains. A Stainless, lever handle, pullout spout faucet is the way to go-- just a note from a retired designer. The biggest thing missing is an organized storage facility for finished work. I might have to turn the corner into the household storage area and get rid of my mothers luggage and my grandchildrens' toys, but I'd rather paint. :-))

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