Thursday, March 27, 2014

Sexy Cobalt Blue

Figuring out just how much white to add to equalize the steps towards a tinted white is one of the biggest concerns when charting.  I had to go back into two mixes to make corrections and may go back into a couple more--cobalt blue with cobalt violet and cobalt blue with TRO. 

Sexy Cobalt Blue was chosen for chart three. As you can see the colors are deliciously rich.

Terra Rosa is chosen for chart four, next to come. There is a burning red in there, whereas Transparent Red Oxide leans towards orange.

Yellow Ochre was chart two. 

And chart one was the Tube colors Richard Schmid chose for his palette, which differed from mine by Viridian instead of Thalo Blue Green, Cobalt Violet instead of Dioxinine Purple, Cadmium Lemon yellow as the lightest yellow instead of ordinary, Cadmium yellow light with no green in it, and no Naples Yellow at all. Some color close to Naples showed up on the Yellow Ochre chart.  On this chart,  Cobalt Blue and Viridian offers a color close  to Cerulean Blue, but no cigar. Whether Cerulean remains on my shopping list is a question still to be answered when all the facts are in. That goes for Naples Yellow as well.

The three colors I chose to chart first make up the simplest palette that offers a range of colors that apply to a couple of paintings I have in progress.   When I finish the Terra Rosa chart, I'll know all I need to know to finish two of those paintings.  JD and My Guys however call for a Cadmium Red Medium Chart. So guess what I'll be doing after Terra Rosa. I am thoroughly enjoying the academic approach to color.  It allows me to plan and keeps me from getting carried away by intuition and a love for spontaneity, which are imperative to have, but only best when backed with solid information. 

NOTE:
After a couple of weeks doing this, I've learned:
Not only did I choose the wrong white for this project, but also the wrong oil medium.  Linseed is the slowest dryer. The Yellow Ochre chart is still wet to the touch. Gamblin Galkyd and Galkyd Lite dry within 24 to 30 hours.  The difference between them has to do with the texture of the finish. Galkyd flattens brushstrokes and will give an enamel like finish and is the fastest drying of the two.  This oil would have been appropriate for this project along with Gamlin Quick Dry Titanium White. When I bought my oils for my first portrait  two years ago, I had no idea when I chose to do it in oils there were so many things to consider.  Linseed oil, turpentine and tubes of paint had been my only supplies when I gave up this medium fifty years ago. Things have come a long way. Thanks to our demands and the grinders of paint. 


 

 

 

8 comments:

  1. I always amaze myself by thinking how many actual decisions go into each brushstroke that is applied to the canvas - your posts are enumerating them for us!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had an idea as soon as I did that first portrait in oil that opened the door to explore the medium and the genre. The portrait came out fine, but was too tight in my opinion because I was tight. Gestural became an interest. Wet-into-wet became important. The more I attempted the technique, the more I realized I didn't understand how to use the medium. I'm taking the time to to learn what tools are in the tool box and how to use them better.

      Delete
  2. This is a LOT of work, Linda!!! But now, I know where to go for the latest information on oil painting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And I really sucked at science. But there is science in paint--no one ever told me that and being a spontaneous painter following intuition more than a book, I didn't want to know. With everyone in Blogsville painting alla prima and plein air, fast dry, slow dry are important topics IF one is a slow painter (me) or one likes to bring their alla prima, plein sire painting home from the hills without smearing oil paint all over the back seat of the car. These aren't the most exciting of posts, perhaps a bit boring, but I am a good self taught student and I wish I had known this stuff before I got started with this project. I plan to correct the oil and the white for the rest of these charts, which Ellis thinks are gorgeous. He's an abstract fan and grid system aficionado. :-))

      Delete
  3. what a beautiful chart...it is a work of art in and of itself. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ellis is loving these charts! They got him to actually talk about my art. In nearly fifty four years of marriage he has never talked about my art. I thought he was I'll. Turns out he's wondering why I'm bothering with portraiture when the best work I've done is abstractions loosely touching on a subject--gestural paintings and drawings. He didn't realize I was trying to take portraiture to that level. Longest art conversation ever. Amazing.

      I am going to do two more, Terra Rosa and Cadmium red medium. Then I'll have a smal palette of three primaries. I may have to add Cadmium Yellow Light (pale hue) too. YO has a lot of sienna in it as does Cobalt Blue. A clearer green may be difficult. anyway, it's a way to think to get through all twelve: add the chart as you require the color--build your palette. PS don't give up on me. Ellis has interest in Portland.
      My nephew lives there with his little son named for Ellis brother who passed away way too young from colon cancer. I'll email you when we finally figure out what's what.

      Delete
  4. I am beginning to understand the importance of this making colour charts, but do you retain the info you have learned....or have to keep referring to your charts as you paint? I really admire your determination (stubborn-ness?) , enthusiasm, (stubborn-ness?) and your hard work, (yep, stubborn!)
    Puts me to shame!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not stubborn, curious. I chose what colors to chart based upon the paintings I had in progress and wanted to finish. I've been working on them as I go along. I think knowing the scope of a color and how it behaves with other colors saves a lot of mixing and search time .

      Delete