Sunday, January 26, 2014

Van Gogh's Hero

My copy (in progress) of Van Gogh's copy of one of Millet's Diggers


As the trend among artists these days is to copy Sargent, Van Gogh copied Millet, his favorite artist, in 1880 when he decided to become an artist at the age of 27. His goal was to get into the Academy, but he didn't think he had natural talent, so he systematically taught himself by copying Millet and others plus drawing from plaster casts.  What was good enough for Van Gogh, according to page one of Van Gogh at Work, (another awesome birthday gift), to arouse my artistic muse, ( who seems to be hibernating through this record winter), long enough for me to copy one of Van Gogh's drawings of one of Millet's Diggers. Tonight, the plan is to add the second Digger. Graphite, in front of the TV, in front of a cozy fire, isn't a bad way to spend a winter night.

On my way through my sketchbook to find a clean sheet, I ran across a couple more copies I made from Sargent.  The challenge of this snowy, bitter cold Sunday was to photograph them and export them into Window 8--learning a bit more about navigating the system.  After installing and uninstalling my old, comfortable Jasc Photo Album software and totally confusing Windows 8, I was successful--and a tad bit more savvy.  Of course, I did it all with a glass of wine within reach.





LWR copies Sargent



 
LWR copies Sargent a lot, but now maybe Van Gogh?



 

10 comments:

  1. I think copying the Masters is such a wonderful thing to do... I have to say your sketches are fantastic!!! I LOVE your sketch of Renata Borgatti!! amazing work, Linda..maybe I need that glass of wine within reach!!!

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    1. No, no, no wine when drawing, just when trying to learn to navigate a new computer system--and plenty of it!

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  2. Van Gogh was so productive, within such a short time.

    Enjoy the book. Sounds fascinating.

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    1. I'm a pushover for beautiful art books. I like the tidbits of historic info they off plus the gorgeous color plates. Van Gogh decided he wanted to be an art late. If he was late, what does that make me? :-))

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  3. I saw a series of van Gogh paintings that used Millet's compositions...it was so interesting to see how he changed some things and left some things. Fascinating! Your drawings are great!

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    1. There is so much to look at and learn at the museum and in books from the masters. It's a good way to spend a few hours a week. Thanks--now if I could set this Windows 8 aside, my muse is ready to go every time I open these gorgeous books. As soon as I've got everything I want working. Yesterday, I screwed up my Skyp account, by being stubborn about my email account. Don't ask.

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  4. These drawings are great Linda ! Love them!!! I'm a huge fan of Sargent too....

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    1. Thanks Helen. There have been times when I wondered why I ever put down my pencil and picked up a brush. Add color to the equation, and it complicates. The translation of black and white to the shades, hues, tints of the rainbow is a giant step Vincent didn't take immediately. He didn't trust his natural abilities. He stuck with charcoals, graphite and ink and copied the masters relentlessly till he felt comfortable, then added watercolor washes. Smart guy.

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  5. All really great drawings copies or not, and my favorite is the woman in profile, so beautiful.

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  6. Mine too! Some of the drawings I did quickly; others, I took my time. She was one of the longer drawing sessions. Thanks Jane.

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