Thursday, September 5, 2013

Markers? I'd Rather Paint.


All the markers in the set tested fluid. I had brought them out of storage and upstairs to tide me over my recuperation week. After testing them out however, I decided markers were then, paint is now. I've lost interest.  Maybe it was the day I had?  Ellis and I went to the hospital for the pre orthopedic surgery meeting where everything that was going to happen next Tuesday and Wednesday was explained thoroughly.

I was a nervous wreck before we went. I woke up feeling like a cold was coming on. My head was killing me. My face hurt and my stomach was upset. I was full of remorse for having signed up for this procedure and my body was giving me an out.  How incredibly strong our minds are!

I told Ellis, "I have a stomach ache. I can't go to school today." He laughed and said, "Get in the car."  I did as I was told pouting--and a couple of hours later was glad I did.  The meeting put my mind to rest. I was going to be well taken care of.  My procedure was the latest, greatest scientific development in orthopedic surgery. I'm not having a "half knee replacement," I am having a "knee resurfacing."  My bones are all good. My muscles are good.  It's just the cartilage that needs replacing. I will be walking the stairs and able to put my weight on that leg before I leave the hospital the day after surgery. Reassured and relieved, I went home and collapsed from the exhaustion of my previous tension.

All I wanted to do is to recoup my enthusiasm.  An email from Lustenhouwer perked me up. It's forty something minutes long and extremely interesting for those of us who have frowned on the use of photography and/or projectors in making art.   David Hockney investigated the historic use of the camera in art and made some astounding discoveries.  It's long, I know--a BBC production--but well worth a look see.


12 comments:

  1. Hi Linda,
    I was just looking at Sharon Wright's blog and she really is painting your portrait from your photo!
    Maybe you've already seen it, but I thought I'd let you know anyway.
    Have a great day and it seems like you are. :)
    Sincerely,
    Gary.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think she's doing a great job. I thought of her work when I printed out the photo. I'm honored that she wanted to spend time with me. :-))

      Delete
  2. A bit disappointed that you didn't love the markers, but I think you are right to focus on your current obsession.

    Glad you had a good pre-operation visit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was very reassuring. With just resurfacing they encourage a lot of walking and putting weight back on the leg--not to be a scardy cat. I liked that. They also want you to climb stairs.

      I'll probably doodle with the markers. They are water soluble and I've got pens for depth I won't be able to stand being away from color/drawing till that leg is strong enough to stand in front of an easel and move about the studio. That's my main priority. I intend to be an excellent physical therapist enthusiast.

      I think portraiture is more than a passing thing with me. I do love people and exploring the character I see in their expressions, forms, body language and of course their eyes. The eyes have it.

      Delete
  3. Totally agree with you I wish you much strength with your knee surgery love courage it comes good again hugs Danielle

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Danielle. My time in the studio has been limited this last week. I've been busy making sure Ellis can get dinner for the two of us for a couple of weeks. Then there's been making arrangements for the home care equipment deliveries. I'm already going through cold turkey with regards to painting, but that's a good thing. You shouldn't paint when you're distracted; you'll just make a mess. I've learned that lesson the hard way.

      Delete
  4. Wishing you a very speedy recovery and return to the canvas. Be well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Hallie. I've relaxed a little about the whole thing, but won't really be relaxed till I wake up and people are bothering me about getting back in shape. I am looking forward to that and hope I come out of this saying, "I should have done it years ago." EXCEPT years ago, they didn't have this procedure. It's new in the orthopedic bag of tricks. Came about just last year. In that respect, I'm a guinea pig. OMG more worries! Just kidding. Thanks again for wishing me well.

      Delete
  5. Linda: One of the reasons I have been missing of late is that I injured my knee. I can only imagine what you have gone through. I wish you the speediest of recoveries.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so sorry JJ. I still have today and tomorrow to get through, before I get through what I want to get through: repairing that knee. Tuesday morning I should be a basket case till they give me those wonderful sedatives and the next thing I know I wake up with a heavy leg in desperate need of rehabilitation. I'm very impressed with the hospital I'm going to. It's the only one in the Detroit area that has this new robotic technology that is MAKOplasty. They tll me I am very fortunate to be a candidate for this surface replacement procedure where only the missing cartilage is replaced and no bone or muscle is cut. Supposedly, recovery is quick. I call quick 24 hours; they call quick six weeks--but four of those weeks are doing what I'm doing now-- physical therapy exercises (outpatient--means I can drive) and icing. Sounds doable. Hopefully the pain is less than the pain I've learned to live with.

      Meanwhile I have had a wonderful summer and spring reading everything one could possibly want to know about George Washington who lived his life with pain from his decaying teeth and the dentures of the time. All those paintings we saw as kids where his mandibular looked oddly extended were the truth of dentistry in its infancy. I found it strange that George allowed the artists that truth. He was a vain man. His image was very important to him, yet he had to put up with human teeth bought from the poor mounted in ivory settings. The whole contraption turned black with time and that's why George never smiled or laughed. His dentures were never made of wood, just aged ivory and human extracted teeth. Yuk.

      Delete
  6. Dear Linda, I wish you all the best for this surgery!
    Resume the use of the knee having less pain as possible .. SOON!
    Sometimes dreams come true.
    So be it!

    Hugs and smiles
    Rita

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope so. I'm counting on it. I'm very nervous as Tuesday morning approaches. I really can't wait for this wait to be over. Everything will be uphill from there. Thanks Rita. Hugs and smiles back.

      Delete