Monday, August 12, 2013

Reference Photographs Not Enough

Buddah Board Water Drawing, (still wet, upper right)

The only painting that went on this last glorious weekend was on the Buddah Board my friend regifted me at lunch the other day. When she gave it to me, I wasn't sure what I was going to do with this disappearing drawing toy, but as I was enjoying the fabulous weather this weekend--just right temps, no rain clouds in the sky, not a time to spend in the basement studio painting time--I doodled my water bottle to see what it was all about.  It was sort of fun.  You draw with water on a felt-like surface and the picture disappears as the water stains dry up.  You can hold the picture for a bit, with a cover that comes with it. I saw no reason to do that. BUT THE VALUE OF IT WAS THAT I DID DRAW SOMETHING FROM LIFE VERY QUICKLY AND IN SO DOING EXERCISED MY HAND/EYE COORDINATION. So, as Martha S. would say, "The Buddah Board is a good thing."

The other drawing I did this weekend was what I do best: floorplans--first for possilbe remodeling projects pending upon how they quote out.  I have to tell you, this is the drawing that really excites me.  The idea that I'm designing/drawing something that could become a concrete reality that people can live in comfortably and enjoy everyday really turns me on. The art instructor way back who said, "Linda, you're a designer," knew what she was talking about. Thank God I ran into her in the early stages of my search for artistic identity. It did lead to a lifetime of putting my abilities towards the best, happiest use. Hopefully, my new clients won't mind me showing you my preliminary scribbles, the scribbles that made me forget all about going for a swim in the lake. From here and the decisions this scribble helped make, I plan to go on to drafting a decent, extremely neat drawing, they can use to get accurate quotes from the trades. It is nice to know how much something is going to cost before anything gets ripped out. Actual costs can change people's perspective.

Valerie here in my practice painting actually looks like Valerie
up close, in the flesh.The discovery was a very happy surprise.
Well it's Monday, Laundry day and the rain is back.  There's a portrait or two that need attention. Oh--and funny thing. I ran into the young ladies in Best Friends playing together in the street Saturday. Vanessa in real life looks like Vanessa I've got going on canvas.  Valerie, the young lady I was having so much difficulty with, looked in the flesh, like I have her on canvas too even though the reference photo says there's more to do!  The amazing likeness I captured by one accident after another, underlines the importance of a live sitting in the portrait process. Seeing her again, sold me that photography wasn't enough. Portrait subjects have to spend some time in
the portrait chair.   Happy painting guys.




7 comments:

  1. I would have to agree...the Buddah board is a good thing...whatever IT IS! bUT IT SEEMS YOU NEED NO HELP WITH THE HAND/EYE CO-ORDINATION. But I have to agree about the life sittings for portraits...a whole new ballgame.

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    1. It really is a whole new ball game. Something that's impossible to do with subjects that live long distances away--like JD. Consequently, portrait artists are confined to local commissions and/or must be willing to travel. The fee would have to be set to cover travel expenses or the client would have to be willing to provide work space, room and board as in the 17 and 1800s. Another reason to concentrate on another genre. :-))

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    2. oh, my, don't talk yourself out of portrait painting, it has it's own rewards!

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  2. Ola Linda!
    I love, love Buddha! Love it! Love it! Love it!
    I also very much enjoy the stages of the two girls portrait! So very interesting to see the progress. I am so glad you photographed the different sessions. Thank you for taking the time! Keep on keeping on my artist buddy!
    Michael

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    1. My pleasure Michael. The Buddha board did prompt painting fast, very fast. So not only was it an exercise in eye/hand coordination, but also speed.

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  3. So great that your painting looked like the real Valerie! I know nothing about painting portraits, but thanks for your comment on my attempt on the Vermeer girl. I appreciate it very much coming from your vast experience with portraits!

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    1. I wouldn't say vast Judy. I'm really quite the novice. I only discovered my pencion for portraiture a year a half ago when I did my first in oils. Previously to that, I did do portraits of family members in graphite for my own amusement. Transfering from graphite to oils is quite the adventure.:-)) Saturday's discovery that what I thought was going along poorly was actually going along quite well. Now I'm thinking I have to stick with people I can get to come over and sit in my chair for an hour or so. I really don't know why I want to stick with this genre? It really has no potential for becoming a rewarding occupation (other than the joy of achieving a painted success)--yeilding at least enough funds to offset the expense of materials. A great deal of promotion is required and I've exhausted my enthusiasm for such things my years spent in the design field. But I keep on. This genre doesn't bore me. It requires the same studied evaluation and calculation as spacial design with the added problems of the spacial qualities of color/values. I do adore a challenge in spite of the aggravation. More than you wanted to know? Of course, but replying to comments made as they strike me has been very helpful with regards to figuring out the business of art. Thank you Judy.

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