Tuesday, August 6, 2013

LWR Draws Sargent's Drawing of Sargent

When life gets in the way of studio time, sketch.  

I chose to "copy" another Sargent, a self portrait he sketched around 1880. Another linear drawing, I did my own heavy handed rendition. Hopefully I'll be able to get back to my girls tomorrow to rectify the disaster of a start that was yesterday. You know I can't discard that practice little head till I understand where I got lost.




10 comments:

  1. you didn't get lost......you had to stop before you were finished.

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    1. Can you hear me laughing? Very good my dear. Wish I'd thought of that.

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  2. I love the energy in this sketch. =)

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    1. These scribble type line drawings of Sargent's are handwritten. Copying them is more for forgers and counterfeiters than students. The gist is all we can do thus LWR drawing Sargent drawing Sargent. Thanks Roger.

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  3. I took a look at Sargent's sketch in the 42 sketch portrait drawing book of his work - and you nailed it, Linda! Its very close to his work and captures the energy of the strokes extremely well! Nice job!

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    1. Thanks Susan. Now if I can dig this kid out of the mess I made of her. Started yesterday. I didn't get far enough to make the save.

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  4. Excellent sketch of Sargent's work...We need to see more!! Great exercise!!!

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    1. Thanks Hilda. I've been lax this year--too busy exploring saltless sauces, dips and spreads. With a few in the fridge, it"s time I did some catching up. September will be a good month for more Sargent.

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  5. I like it too and Celeste Bergin - above - has also been doing some wonderful Sargent sketch copies. Very inspiring and making me want to try it too. Sargent's talents were under attack when I went to art school.They said his brushwork was too "facile." Go figure. Now he is back in fashion and the looseness is highly desirable.
    Regarding the small size discussion you have going on. Carol Marine also inspired me to start painting small and I agree it was terribly difficult at first. Still can be. The upside has been in classes where I have the monthly focus done first in the small size. Artists tend to simplify more - grasping the essence, and yet when they move onto a larger size they put in the kitchen sink! Some of their best work has been on the small format.
    My personal goal has been to find a way to develop a complex use of a small format and the challenge still engrosses my mind. It is far easier to work large, I agree with everyone on that, but the rewards I have found working small have been quite satisfying and still not accomplished as far I hope to go.
    Love your blog by everyone being able to exchange thoughts/opinions like these.

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