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Monday, February 25, 2013

I'm Home

Long Ride Home, 10 x 13", Pastels

Actual, untouched
reference photograph for
Long Ride Home.
My long ride home is over. Over the weekend, this painting went blue, gray, almost totally black and white.  It was so cold, I had to turn the heater on in the studio. I couldn't stand the chill. My only choice was to wear gloves and a muffler or warm it up.  I chose to push warmer colors back into winter even though  I was lying. How realistic do I need to be?

Not at all. Pushing color is what painting is all about.  The photograph of this scene is what it really looked like through our car window. The world was bleak, scary, and you didn't want to be out in it. I could have copied it verbatim and almost did over the weekend, but chose instead to add a little warmth, add a little charm, add a lot of colors I didn't see at the scene or in the photograph. 

20 comments:

  1. I have no idea why, but I want to put some purple in it! Apart from that I salute your vision......how you got there from that photo is admirable.

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    1. There is violet in it, but it's grayed down. Left on it's own, it hit you in the face. Purple would have really punched hard and fought with the signs. I wanted muted. White was unsatisfactory. It was too stone cold blue. This was a teaser, till I decided duplicating the lack of coloration in the photo really made for a dull, depressing painting.

      That's the idea of working from photographic 'sketches.' You use them as you would any preliminary sketch you did on the spot--as a place to start. Then simplify, embellish, push the color (as I did), change the season, add the info from another photograph. One does not want to make a copy, but an original. The photograph pictured here is good all by itself. The painting I did has merit too. I really understand now why one does not buy pastels in sets, but rather by the stick.

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  2. I love how you have interpreted the scene, but I really have an aversion to snow ... any kind.

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  3. I like the color - an exact representation is for photographers. It could be the sun shining through the trees onto the scene (I guess - what does this Floridian know anyway?)

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    1. Well Dan there seems to be a bit of an argument between those who paint from photographs--me--and those who like to go out into the field and paint from life on the spot. I say that photographs are another way of sketching a scene. You can paint on the spot from life for a bit--till the sun sinks low in the sky--then you can photograph whatever and finish the painting at home--either remaining true to what you saw on site, or what you wished you saw on site. The photograph is just a tool, another form of taking a note to aid your memory. The artist can do with it what she likes. I liked warmer with this one. As it was (cold as ice) wasn't aesthetically pleasing to me--or, I would guess, anybody else.

      I like this drawing because there's an old fashioned feel to it. It's Mark Twain.

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  4. I really like this painting Linda, you were so right to add some warmth to it.

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    1. It needed some life Ann. Color is life.

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  5. Linda: You took a cold scene and added warmth. I am impressed. However, now that I am a weather wimp living in Florida, I'm going to say you made it "hot." Good job!

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    1. Thanks JJ. It is unusual, but so was the day I shot the reference. The reason could be that I'm reading a book about painting from photographs and pushing the color is something one should do when working from a reference. I didn't need to be told. Pushing color is what painters do. Also white is so deathly white.

      How do you like living in Florida? We keep talking and then don't want to give up the four seasons even if one of them is not our cup of cocoa. --Perhaps I was working my artistic magic when I warmed up winter? We do have enough bison in the freezer. Might as well cast a spell on the weather. :-))

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  6. Your eye for good design is showing!...and the colors you chose to use lend a lot of interest. I like it---big time!

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    1. Thanks. I must admit though, I find this painting weird. It's got a pastoral, over the hills and through the dale to grandmother's house we go to it that came out of the fog somewhere along that desolate road. I might have to try it again not on mid gray tinted Wallis. I also must admit, I haven't been that enthusiastic this winter. I think I left my heart in Mexico?

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  7. Linda!
    Another great work! Full of excitement, movement and drama!
    Love the warm colors. Also love the hints of blue!
    Bravo!
    Michael

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    1. I don't know how exciting it is, or how dramatic, but if you say so Michael,thank you very much.

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  8. Scary ride home but a fantastic pastel...wonderful subtle colors...

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    1. You are so talented with this medium. I am floundering about trying this and that just to see what happens. This painting is weird and out-of-character. Hopefully, I'll find my pastel voice the more I play with them.

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  9. Dear Linda, you painted the landscape and the snow as the French Impressionist painters in a way
    really great!

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    1. Thanks Rita. But this is a quiet one for me. I'm thinking of squaring it off--though there is something charming about the way the trees arch...I'll put it aside till the year end review.

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  10. Impressive and impressionist landscape, I love it.

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    1. Really? I'm thinking it's strange looking for me. Too orderly--but I'll take you word for it. Thanks Sergio.

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