Saturday, November 10, 2012

Hey JD

Hey There Grandson! How've you been? 8 x 10" oil sketch
After weeks away, a get acquainted oil sketch was in order, before hitting the larger canvas. While analyzing the values and making future palette decisions, I decided to leave him in the deep shade that he was in when I took the shot. I  do like how snap shots freeze an imperfect moment--there are so many of them in life.

24 comments:

  1. Now I following daily the progress of your work,Linda, I see in this oil sketch a style similar to that of the portrait with the cat. The tonal values ​​shape, without defining too, give all the important information to establish the portrait in a wonderful way!

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    1. I do like this approach Rita. In the cat painting, the cat's eyes were the focal points. In this portrait, it's the posture of the boy that intrigues me, as well as his expression. Both the viewer and the boy will be standing in the shade. The lighting will be unusual for a portrait.

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  2. Excellent sketch! The strong value contrast makes it strong, I think. Look forward to seeing it on the large canvas.

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    1. Me too. Scary. I had the big canvas up on the easel, and it was so white! I had the idea to tone it with a cool yellowish, blue gray, but wasn't thoroughly convinced. I opted to start with a head sketch. This one sold me on the grayish tone. Grayed yellow, grayed blue and bluish red are in my mind. His skin tones are too warm for being in the shade. These thoughts have pushed me into thinking about what about a scene prompts us to reach for the camera? Yes, it was the boy's posturing. Yes, he was not in an ideal, photographic lighting situation. No, This spontaneous moment could never be set up in the studio. I am pro capturing the moment. I am pro spontanaiety. I am pro alla prima. I am pro taking my real camera everywhere in hopes of capturing people in the middle of living their lives with one click. My plein air may be in coffee shops, doctors offices, airports -- anywhere people gather? My camera is a sketch pad, as is some water solvable markers. A whole lot of analyzing is going on to nail done my painting process. I love it.

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  3. You are so good at whatever you do. Your head and hand work so great together.

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    1. Thank you so much Julie. I am determined to find out just what moves me to paint and how I want to paint. This has been a year well spent.

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  4. It's great, Linda. The values and warm colors and flow of the lines give it so much life. Wonderful start!!!

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    1. No, this is it with this sketch I don't wish to develop it any further. It really is a study to determine what I want to do in the larger rendition. But thanks for your vote of confidence.

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  5. He has a nice face....I bet he is a delightful person. You've captured his charm.

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    1. Now to hold on to it and know when to let go.

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  6. Me encantó pasar poraquí te sigo.Saludos.

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    1. Thank you Carmen. I hope I can carry that over to the bigger canvas.

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  7. Great sketch, Linda! Like Rita, I like your approach without too much detail!

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    1. It's definitely the way to go with these eyes of mine that note every little thing. I also used a big no. 10 brush for most of it.

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  8. Very nice oil sketch. Just enough details, it really works.

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    1. And Ellis recognized the kid! --But then, we have only one blond grandson. :-) the gesture portraiture workshop I took least summer was very valuable.
      In spring, I'm planning for one more course: formal portraiture. I thought I'd get the full picture.

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  9. Linda!
    Great colors. Great brush strokes. Great excitement. Love the energy and joy.
    Your portraits are fabulous.
    Keep on painting.
    Michael

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    1. Okay colors, not cool enough yet, but going that way. My portraits are coming along. It's been a productive year for me. Keep on painting yourself Michael; it's the best.

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  10. Wonderful, Linda! There is a lot of confidence in your brush work and it makes for a very exciting portrait! You have captured his youth, his vigor and his vitality!

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    1. I am working for confident brushstrokes. The workshops, the class, Schmid's Alla Prima book have all been extremely helpful this last year in moving me towards my goal. Thank you Susan.

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  11. He is a kind soul, and I'm pretty good at that kind of analysis.

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    1. Too kind. He's a sweetheart is a hard-hearted world. I worry about his sensitivity.

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  12. I thought I would have a peek as I saw you on Carols blog today. I am a new blogger, just getting started, not yet up and running. I looked at a few of your pieces, and really liked the softness of this particular piece. The big broad strokes and shapes. Nothing too fussy.It kind of has and old illustrative quality to it, like the Hardy Boys

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    1. This is a get acquainted sketch, nothing more. Welcome to blogging Julie. I use blogging as a tool to keep me committed. It's worked for three years come January. Thank you for visiting. I hope you'll become a follower. I look forward to seeing your blog when it's up and running and you get as much pleasure out of it as I do.

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