My Blog List

Sunday, September 2, 2012

We

Not an easy time with this fifth drawing.

This is pretty much my idea. Some attention to the continuity of hair high lights between the images must be considered.

My Charcoal kit, no longer has just charcoal and a knead eraser in it. This drawing made me add my stubs and my home made mahl stick, a paint stir stick to which I added legs (height) cut from another stir stick. It's a good size for small drawings. You can use glue and wait forever, or a staple gun. I liked the gun.Tip: one knead eraser isn't enough. A few are needed if one wants to keep working after one eraser has turned black and is in need of cleaning. Cleaning knead erasers is a good TV/time on the phone pass-time.


I started out thinking I'd put all of these portraits  on one large canvas. That format is risky, but I do think it would be a dynamic piece for a dynamic woman. The other choice is four separate paintings, which would give her decorative hanging options. Then I could separate them on the larger canvas with a white plus sign, but these images are not separate. They all belong to the same gal. The title of this painting is "We."

We are hitting the museum this morning for a look at Vermeer's Woman Holding a Balance. Vermeer did a total of 35 paintings in his lifetime. So for all of us non daily painters, there's hope that we can still strike it big taking our time with a limited output. To the right you see
Woman Holding A Balance, Johannes Vermeer, 1665, oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Widener Collection 1942. Vermeer painted during the Dutch Golden Years. He was born in 1632, died in 1675 leaving his wife in debt.

Picasso and Matisse, on the other hand were successful in their lifetimes. An exhibit of their drawings will also get my attention this morning.

Last week a light bulb went off in my head. I have an observation wall right here on my computer. I put Zac and Steve as I left them in progress as my desk wallpaper. Casually observing the painting days since, I've noticed what needs darkening, what need lightening up, what needs a hard line, what needs to be softened. When I get back to the picture, I know what to do. The same thing happened with a couple of Taylor sketches. As desktop wallpaper, where I fell short showed up real quick. This morning, I fixed the eye in the portrait on the lower left side.  The eyes are all important in this work, but that babe's eye was missing highlights. Not anymore. Last night I tweaked the the sketch I featured today. The computer is an important art tool.

Your computer, your observation wall is wall space is limited
--even if it isn't. 

16 comments:

  1. Have fun at the Museum..aren't we so lucky that we can stand right before a painting...right in the same location where the painter painted it!? That simple thought always thrills me. Well, I love the new drawing. How do you clean a kneaded eraser? Do you just knead it until the black isn't as present? Agree about the computer--how did Vermeer ever manage without it, eh?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes,we are lucky. Vermeer used mirrors--and that little frame they looked through to crop their scenes I seem to recall from Van Eyke readings. Yes, you clean a knead by kneading and kneading till it's bright blue again. The kneading and your body heat makes it more flexible and easier to knead. Kneading is great for keeping fingers limber and hands strong.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Morning, I wanted to say the four faces combination on your screen for today is great, I like how they relate. I don't think you would need the white plus between them; it might detract. The movie; 'Girl with a Pearl Earring' is worth watching - about Vermeer's life with the added entertainmentelement of course. Have a great day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Excellent movie! Another excellent movie is Pollack. I just watched it for the second time.It made me want to run down to the studio to throw and dribble paint. To think that if Pollack lived today, his bi-polar illness could have been kept in check and he might not have made the art he did is amazing. An excellent play to read on the source of creativity is Equus.

      Delete
  4. You are putting a hard work on this one and besides the obvious reason, wanting to make something special for someone special, you do love your art my dear Linda; I read about this love everyday at your posts. I think is admirable and a great lesson for me.
    I will remember the name, Chatzimouratidou, when I get to Athens and you never know; you maybe get a letter or a phone-call from your son's in-laws warning you about a crazy woman they've met :) (I had no idea you had a Greek lady in your family... do your grandchildren talk Greek, I wonder?)
    Hugs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No grandchildren from them, both she and my son don't want kids, just each other. (that's why I'll never get to turn down climbing up to see the Acropolis). They aren't married; if there's no children, they don't think you need a contract. They're not that young either, to think that way. But then what do I know about this new world of singles living their lives together, without legal protection, assuming only the best of each other?

      My son can speak a little Greek--but then even speaking English, he speaks Greek:-) He's very bright and what he says, often goes over my head.

      Delete
  5. These drawings are incredible! You have such a knack for capturing expression. Really great. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Crystal. Compliments from you mean a lot. Expression is what interests me in portraiture. I like painting people reacting to something--the camera, life.

      Delete
  6. Nice to see grow up your outstanding work and follow the motion of your thoughts,dear Linda!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes it is. I'm really enjoying myself now. It certainly took long enough.

      Delete
  7. These drawing are wonderful, Linda!!! You're getting better with every portrait you paint.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Hilda. I'm in the right place now.

      Delete
  8. Very nice - I definitely vote for all in one. But I miss the other face - it had such a style to it! I am so jealous that you are seeing a Vermeer in person! Perhaps the greatest painter of all time. And just think, what an honor to see one of 35.

    I just had a ball tonight painting - first this wild underpainting, and then lo and behold a face over it, quite by surprise - all in one sitting! I am so excited! So I can certainly relate to being in the right place. I just can't plan like you. Well, maybe a little, but not nearly as much - I lose the spark.

    I hope it looks as good to me tomorrow in the morning - lol.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't you just love that exhilaration you feel when painting freely? And the surprises delight. Come morning, light on the painting might be shocking, but hold on to it. It says something about you. It's valuable.

      As much as I like painting freely, I also like to think and plan. Portraits require planning. I like that the genre is people intensive; you have to work with the client throughout the process. You have to get to know them through conversation and lots of photographs of them going through life. Portraiture is an outgoing, socially interactive genre. Painting freely is more reclusive. I think a good balance is freeing up with pastries, flowers or landscapes or free association, but then getting into another person's life, learning what makes them them and capturing that image on canvas.

      Delete
  9. These drawings capture such a vibrant personality - I am enjoying watching your process. I think I must do some drawing...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Carol. It has been a pleasure studying her. Have you ever noticed the models in life drawing workshops show the boredom of their jobs even though they bring costumes? The fact is they are not relating to those costumes; they are just sitting there in them. That's why I prefer drawing from "snapshots," people caught frozen in action.Their faces show us who they are. This gal is multi-faceted. I like her beyond our blood tie. Happy drawing.

      Delete