Tuesday, August 7, 2012

Just A Little Sticker Shock

My Hat that Swims, Self portrait, Charcoal, 9 x 12
Note done on 9 x 12 paper. It's very hard not drawing with
my whole body.  This is practice drawing #1.

Almost packed. Two Mastersen palette boxes hold the total list.
Both fit nicely into the kid's carry-on luggage piece. 
I'm sitting here tallying the score on this workshop thinking I better come out with a hellofalot of helpful hints and an MPA degree in portraiture, (Master of Portraiture Art). It's costing a blimey fortune.

 To the 350, I've already spent joining the Association (50), to get a lower price on the workshop (250), I've added the suggested supplies plus a Kid's carry on suitcase bringing the total cost to a whopping 431.73 plus some tax! The filbert brushes take the prize. They better be more magical than the slanted flats that served me so well on The Unknown Children.


 I didn't charge nearly enough for that portrait. I'm surprised I was even able to paint it with the meager supplies I had on hand, but I did--and didn't do a bad job either. After next week though, I'm going to be fantastic--but starving on some street corner after Honey sees the bills. I'm pretty sure he's going to want to trade this crazy fool in for a wife who just plays Canasta.

Unknown Children
I jest, of course. After the cabana rape in Las Vegas last year, the workshop will be an enriching,  lifetime experience both art-wise and socially, as I step out from my solitude into an active art community with knowledgeable mentors . Every week or three, I am always picking up some sort of art supplies. Fifty bucks here. Twenty bucks there.A book about this technique or that. This is the first time I've kept track of the expense. I don't know why. It's probably because fifty years ago, I did workshops and they left me with a bad taste. I'm building a case against this one before I've even gotten there. Sticker shock. Jitters.

 Jitters aside,art prices should be high. It is a costly pursuit involving not only money, but time and emotional stress chasing after that little piece of perfection we can never quite reach. This workshop may bring me closer to the satisfaction I'm looking for when I look at my own work--or  at the very least, sharpen my eye.  All spent, all packed, I'm ready to go. --After just a bit more practice drawing small with charcoal.



Packed and ready to roll with or without the outstanding UPS order.
Thanks Celeste Bergin for a very functional idea. 

19 comments:

  1. I really love the self-portrait... that hat: a meant to be :-))))

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    1. A marriage made in heaven. Thank. I did have trouble handling the charcoal though sitting up close and personal. I like to stand.

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  2. I think that portrait painting is great. More realism than you later work, fun to see that side of your art.

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    1. This is the side I'm concentrating on this year. Portraiture comprises most of my drawings. I hope to get a lot better at it in the next two weeks. But the test will be JD. Charcoal is easy. Oil paint not so. Hopefully so soon. Thank you for your confidence.

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  3. Dear Linda, your hands are ready to capture the best of everything. You're BRAVA!
    You know how instill in your artwork something that only you know how to do!
    Your sign!
    Understanding how to master "your sign" with a more sophisticated technique may be the new change that you want...And so be it!

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    1. Thank you for your endearing encouragement Rita. What I want out of this workshop is facility, an easiness with the process and materials. I do hope I am not the only novice with oils on the premises. The workshop is for all mediums. I'm leaving my best one at home.

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  4. Replies
    1. Thanks Hallie. I have a few more to go to get the feel of that size. It really feels strange not using my whole arm. The hat became an instant classic in my wardrobe as soon as I put it on my head on the way to checkout.

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  5. Great portrait and interesting remarks about costs. One of the thoughts that I often have is that when we sell our work we don't value it realistically. There's a lot of cheap art out there.

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    1. Thanks Mick. I don't begrudge the cost of education. That's worth it; I think I was just shocked at how much it had gone up since the last time I participated when I was in my twenties. I sounded like an old person who says every time they go to the movies and lay out a ten spot plus, "I remember when it cost a quarter to go to the movies." I've become my dad:)

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  6. great self-portrait.

    I think you'll enjoy the new travel-ready set-up.

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    1. It makes a lot of sense. Now it will take me some set up and wrap up time; I've done a good job compacting. I wish I had known about--nah--there wasn't any roll around luggage with handles when I was toting that huge valise up that huge hill from the parking lot to the college campus in the seventies fighting the wind all the way. Ah modern invention.

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  7. It's not just a beautiful charcoal self-portrait, I can actually see that your are happy; even under your hat that swims and glamorous glasses!! And with the suitcase you seem more like you're going on a journey than on a workshop. So, enjoy your journey!
    Warm regards.
    ps.the Unknown Children is one of my favorites :)

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    1. It's your only favorite. Portraits weren't on my mind till that commission:) It's that commission that got me into all this.

      That suitcase sure does look like I'm going somewhere. I'm not a carry-on traveler. I hope I can check it for the four days. I'm not a baggage handler. Did that once big time in Paris; baggage handlers and other like services were on strike. Ellis, being a young, strong lad at the time, was up in the belly of the 707 with another passenger unloading on stuff on the tarmac. Then all the passengers had to drag their stuff to customs including a an old woman in her seventies! Can you imagine! I was thrilled that my mom had lent us her new luggage with the wheels. I pulled mine and carried her's too. In our seventies now, we go no where with luggage we can't handle ourselves.

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  8. Your self portrait is wonderful. Have a fantastic creative trip!

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    1. A trip is right Nora. I do have a lot of baggage to tote--and I don't think they're serving white wine, lunch or pretzels.

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  9. I believe this experience will be worth its weight in gold. The cost be damned - full steam ahead!

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  10. I think your portraits are stunning!

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  11. Oh it is very impressive art. Really the art is the sign of love, hate, respect and image of mind which is reflected on our paper or on sand. It make is happy and smile with a philosophical thought. Many thanks for your nice share.

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