My Blog List

Monday, July 9, 2012

In The Meantime, In Between Time

Rain Forest, Digital Art 2012

Kick-off digital photograph
In the meantime, in between times are called breaks.

What do you do while paint dries or you want to relax your drawing arm, or you just don't feel like facing the challenges of portraiture 100% that day? I have fun. This weekend I fooled around with watercolor or digital photography special effects and the Paint software. You saw the results yesterday, one of which reminded me of Jackson Pollack, the non traditional, unconventional, well connected, Expressionistic artist of note. You all liked that one best of the two experimental works.

 I wasn't comparing myself to Pollack. He was a notable mover and a shaker who did things his way and had spousal connection and a great friend in the art world with the best of the best public relations. I'm just me who likes to fool around when taking a break. The results however were Pollackesque, as is the digital painting I did this morning.

Breaks clear your head, give you a fresh outlook and send you back to the studio refreshed. I'm all for them.    This morning, in between laundry loads, I took advantage of the time and worked on the second digital photograph that nobody liked. It was too blah. Unmentionable. I agreed. BUT: something about it reminded me of my rain photograph. I ran down and got it and using it, opened White Asparagus (for lack of a better title) in Paint.  I digitally "painted" into White Asparagus using the rain photograph as the kick-off. I like what I got and also got a clearer idea of why my acrylic painting of Rain Forest had been disappointing. It wasn't broken up enough I was trying too hard to follow the photograph and didn't let loose.

 Back in the studio, JD is back on the drawing board. In this drawing he has his mouth closed. I like the look in his eyes. I'm going slowly and used the grid system to get the angle of his head. That angle is important if his pose (playfully perched on that fence) is to be believable. In the painted portrait, I'm thinking of using the eyes from this photo and the smirking smile from the other.


18 comments:

  1. The eyes work!!

    Back later, in a rush

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. YES THEY DO! FINALLY. Much more shading to do in addition to the rest of the face and hair and neck, but slowly I plod and he will be mine. "HaHaHaHa," she cackled. "Come back soon ya hear."

      Delete
  2. I do learn a subject over time, like I can paint Irises in my sleep, but I wouldn't be able to take one thing from one painting and use it in another like you plan, but I think you got more patience than me. =)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It shouldn't be too difficult. His head is cocked in the same position in both reference photographs. A lot of preparatory photographs are a necessity in portraiture. Most of us have our mannerisms. In fifty or so preparatory photographs, how we usually move should become apparent. Looking through the photos I took of the boy when he was here, I did see that he mugs for the camera in much the same way as Princess Diana did--head bent down to the side, eye with a slight twinkle looking up at the lens. JD does the same.

      Patience is the clash I'm having with portraiture. I am not patient. I do like painting freely on the canvas--like? I love it. Patience is the hardest adjustment. That's why all the breaks. I haven't mastered it yet!

      Delete
  3. I’ve spend some time in your blog today and beside your art I have to say I love your spirit. It’s a great pleasure to have blog-met you! I don’t have a clue about Photoshop, but I very much enjoy its art. Beautiful work. -like-like-like the eyes by the way, very colorful with a sense of twinkle.
    Best regards.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank You Konstantina. I don't know much about Photoshop either. I like to click around and see what happens. It's the portraiture I'm interested in. Problem is I'm a novice with little patience trying to do something that requires a lot of skill and a lot of patience. Thank you so much for becoming a follower. I'll be visiting you soon.

      Delete
  4. Great fooling around and great plan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I did have fun this morning in Paint. I hadn't spent much time there though I've had the program for quite a while. That photograph just suggested it needed color and the way it was laid out reminded me of Rain, so I let it rain between the towels and the casual perma-press. Now the other one looks like it could use a little something:-))

      Delete
  5. I love the unconventional, and I love color, so it works for me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was a morning of exploration with Paint software. I enjoyed it much more than stain removal and changing loads and, of course, the laundry fell behind. An artistic time filler was much more interesting.

      Delete
  6. OK. I know I'm on your sh-- list. ;) I said Pollock wouldn't like to do digital art (what do I know, anyway?) - I wasn't comparing you to Pollock, and if you re-read my comment from yesterday, I said I liked what you did.

    Anyway, today, I can totally see the resemblance to Pollock - it reminds me of his drip paintings, but even more so to your own outdoor paintings.

    And today I am thinking I don't want to be compared to folks that said "man will never fly!" So do your digital art! It is art - I admit it!

    I like those sly happy eyes!! Now that's art! (Whoops, there I go again).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry. My attempts at commenting and humor are not so hot of late. Your digital work is beautiful. That is the bottom line, and I am glad for your break. please disregard my last few comments

      Delete
    2. I wasn't offend Dan; I thought you were with my reply. I don't have a sh--list and I sure was hoping you didn't have one either. We were both talking what is art?

      I think it's natural--not really the best word--for artists to not take to the "mechanical drawing" of the new age--digital photography with its computerized prints, iPad sketching, the latest Etch-a-sketch. We create hands on. But the mechanical computer chip age is in full swing, and we have to use it (photography) for juried shows,to get into art schools and most likely to show gallery owners. Everyday, I use computerized photography to show whatever I painted and often it lets me down. With certain paintings with dominant reds and blues the computer rendition is off and no matter what I do, I can't get the subtle colorations to show as they really are; either red or blue dominates. Under these circumstances, to play around with these photographic programs is natural.

      But, I do not count these playful items as art--though probably someday they will be, (Avatar, the movie). I would count them as artful prints, if I printed them.

      My playful, artful follies came out Pollockesque. I do think he would have experimented with the "medium." I have no doubt in my mind that his beautiful, expressionistic canvases began as play and were no where near as polished as the huge ones we see in the museums. Every artist was playing around at that time. Movements had movements.That period was absolutely confusing as artists tried to redefine art as it suited their style and sensibilities. But he did take his playful works and finely tune them using special paints on gorgeous, natural canvas. Up close they are magnificent. Very tactile--but don't touch; museum guards get huffy. Their size alone makes them awe inspiring.

      Please don't tell me that stuff is beautiful when you don't think so. I wouldn't. It is not beautiful. It's interesting. It was fun. That's all. It was the best I could do with my mouse, (a number 12 fibert mouse available at Staples) while doing laundry at the same time.

      Your comment was "meaty." I loved it. It got us talking beyond, "Nice drawing Linda. Keep up the good work." As the little bird says, A hug to you Dan Kent.

      Delete
  7. I like the digitals...they would look good anywhere. Isn't it strange how art transforms the room...in a good way? I am watching your JD sketches with interest. When will you paint it onto a canvas? How do you decide?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In a doctor's exam room, to ponder as we wait scantily dressed in paper sacks for our check ups.

      I haven't prepped the canvas yet. It's big, 48 x 60. (It's overly ambitious for someone so new to the genre, but what-the-hell. If not now, never). But I am a bit wary of the adventure.
      Now that I've got the angle of his head, I feel that my initial drawing on the canvas will be okay. Then the hard work starts. I'm going to use acrylic for the under layers and the finished layers will be oils.

      I still haven't finished my three guys. So I'm not in a rush with JD. I think I maybe holding back till after that workshop, when maybe I'll have a clearer idea of what I'm doing. If I could get him sketched in by the time of the workshop, I'll be happy. I'll be involved again. My kids' visit did break my rhythm.

      Delete
  8. Hi L W Roth! Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a lovely message. Yes portraiture can certainly be difficult, especially if it is a family member or friend. I really enjoyed looking at your recent photos of food . Amazing! I also will be very happy to become a follower of your blog!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Helen. Thank you for dropping by and thank you for following. It's such a booster when we get an endorsement from a talented peer. It lifts my spirits and production.

      Actually, I think family are the easiest. They have to love what I do; they're family. It's commission work that's scary. The client's perception is what counts. It's a difficult business keeping everybody happy.

      Delete
  9. Linda, JD's eyes are wonderful. I read a quiet mischief in them.

    ReplyDelete