Sunday, June 24, 2012

Framing Kelly: Packaging Image on Paper



Kelly set to go home in a rosewood frame from Frames by Mail

I was more than pleased when the frame arrived on Friday, a day or two shy of the five business day standard deliver. That gave us more than enough time to assemble it before the kids got home from Chicago. They should be back by late this afternoon. So Ellis and I spent the morning putting everything together--the drawing, double mat, non acid backing, cardboard back filler, non-glare Plexiglas and the deep,rich rosewood frame I've been anxious to see in person. The simplicity of it and its rich warm eggplant veneer with subtle graining gives the drawing the elegant finish I thought it would. It's a great birthday present.  I'm glad I decided I wanted it to be ready to be hung when they got it home. Frame stores aren't around every corner where they live.

 A little double mat arrived in the same package.  I got it for the hell-of-it. It's sized for shipping in an envelope via the post office. I got it for experimental purposes. I wanted it around to see if indeed a decent section of any daily sketch could be extracted from a larger drawing gone awry.  It can.  As alarming as it sounds, with the proper packaging,  poor images can be made to look sign-able  and saleable.


22 comments:

  1. Cropping, Passe-Partout and framing can make a big difference to a painting/sketch. Gives it a little bit class.
    I like your sketches. I never sketch and I suck at it to be honest. I should do it, but lack of time have been a big issue for me.

    Happy painting

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    1. Happy painting to you too Roger.Kelly took longer than a sketch, two to three days. The pastel was spontaneous and fast. I think works on paper require matting. Some oils require a linen liner. If I was to frame my Four Seasons, I'd use a linen liner then the frame. The paintings are intense and need some air around them.

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  2. What a beautiful mat and frame! I use a small mat like yours for the same purpose. There is always a part in a painting that is good while the rest is rubbish. :)

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    1. I think so too. This one is cut for long compositions within compositions. I should figure out one for 8 x 10s that ends up sized for a standard size frame. That's my next move.

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  3. Kelly looks wonderful framed. I'll check out Frames by Mail--I hate the framing part; I always wait until the last minute and there are no ready-made frames around the corner from me.

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  4. I like the mat color you chose for the graphite piece. I have been wondering what kind of matting would be best for graphite and charcoal pieces, since they have so much of the paper color showing. A white or offwhite just doesn't seem right. I like the muted color here. The artwork inside BOTH mats is beautiful too! I like how you cropped the floral piece. But now I'm thinking you should get your own mat cutter...

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    1. Tarragon is the color from that company. It is a deep sage/gray. Complements the graphite very well. Kelly, I 'm pleased with. The pastel not at all. I was just showing that bad sketches do have some salvageable sections.

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  5. What a beautiful gift, I agree, it is very elegant. Passe-partouts are fabulous to pull out something good from bad. Have a nice start of week .

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    1. What a fancy name for a mat with a window, albeit the French word "passe." I really prefer a window mat split into two right angles. Then it's adjustable and you can really play around extracting an inner composition that works well. This one will end up on some daily sketch. It's too nice to let it get grimy from a lot of handling.

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  6. Precioso retrato, el marco es perfecto, tienes muy buen gusto en tu elección. El cuadro de flores es muy llamativo y los colores encantadores. ¡Un abrazo!

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    1. Thank you Sonia. The flower pastel is not my best, but the idea of finding and extracting a balanced section of it is a good one. It shows me that there's no such thing as a bad painting. Something good can be salvaged and used to your advantage.

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  7. The finished product looks good.

    For playing around with composition, I have used L-shaped pieces of paper. Just slide two of them to appropriate size.

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    1. Me too. That's the way to do it. This little double mat was also a curiosity thing. I wanted to know how much shipped for a tiny painting/drawing, double mat. It was $15.64. Shipping was free since I ordered the frame and Plexiglas for Kelly. If I hadn't, shipping would have been about $8.00, which is still cheaper than what someone around here would have charged me.

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  8. Linda, the rosewood frame is divine! And your flowers in pastel look fabulous in a mat. I am always amazed what a HUGE difference a good mat and frame make to a painting.

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    1. Isn't the color and simplicity of the frame great! I've been looking at it for a year or so. Kelly visit and my drawing of Kelly gave me the green light to actually buy one and see what it really looks like. Very rich. Ellis, (an old picture framer) even liked my selection--unlike my choice of frames on my sunflower watercolor. I really screwed that one up. Ask Bill Cook of William Cook Fine Art).

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  9. If you look on my sidebar, Linda, you will see I like my stuff mounted and framed exactly the same as, "Kelly" ...great minds think alike!

    We're off to Sheffield tomorrow see a new printer/framer ... will report back.

    How clever, with the mat & window thingy - really works doesn't it? Clever clever clever!

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    1. The two right angle pieces of mat is the way to do it. I'll end up putting something in this either for me or for family or for some kind stranger who throws money my way. Good luck on your buying trip. That's so important in the art business. Problem is buying in volume which talks a better a game with manufacturers.
      Most artists don't have that advantage. You might with the number of prints you do. ((We were in the mass original art business before the design/build business; I know a lot about it. And what I know about it holds me back in fine art sales).

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  10. The framed sketch "Kelly" is fabulous! It makes a wonderful present.

    The cropping thing... you have to have the artistic eye to crop it for maximum effect. Just saying. (You have it.)

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    1. Thank you Pamo. Kelly really likes it. That made me feel good.

      Thanks. Cropping is often necessary with spontaneous sketches. Paintings, you better get it right first pass; you don't have the luxury of cutting out the bad.

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    1. Thank you Allen. Are you any relation to the Cutlers of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan?

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  12. Great looking sketches. I used to sell things like this, but it was too much trouble doing custom shipping for the different portraits.

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