Thursday, February 2, 2012

In The Studio, My Working Flap-Mat

FOR VICTOR ERRINGTON OF VIC'S ONE A DAY: MY STUDIO FLAP MAT:

FOAM BOARD BACKING JOINED TO WINDOW MAT WITH A DRAFTING TAPE HINGE.
The artwork has been positioned and taped to the back. The window in the mat has been covered with a piece of acetate, which is optional*.


A FLAP-MAT IS A PROTECTIVE "BOOK".


WHEN THE BOOK IS CLOSED, THE ARTWORK CAN BE STORED SAFELY.


* Acetate protects the artwork, but not the mat. It also collects dust specks, so it has disadvantages. A piece of vellum, tracing paper, taped to the back of the foam board and then flipped over the front mat will protect both the artwork and the mat. I use this "working" flap mat in the studio to check out composition to see how I'm doing. So far, I've managed to keep this mat pretty clean.

Shipping artwork to buyers. I would position the artwork on the foam board with drafting tape, place the window mat over that (without hinging the two together) and then sandwich the acid-free artwork sandwich with thin cardboard. Slide it into a padded envelop that fits just right and it would be safe for mailing. Postal padded envelopes, in case you haven't guessed, is what determine the size of artworks on paper and then the finished mat size. One would want to work no bigger than what would fit into the largest standard shipping envelop.

MISCELLANEOUS NOTE:

I went to Amazon yesterday to look at a book they thought I'd be interested in, (now THEY are good salespeople); I was. It was on acrylics--300 tips. I love tips. So I decided to buy it. Going through the motions, I was invited to have a photograph displayed with this book whenever somebody goes to that page. I put in Winter 2012, and priced it and wrote a line or two. This seemed to be an opportunity to advertise on Amazon--instead of Amazon advertising on my blog? I'm going to check it out today to see if I understood the deal correctly. But I figured what could it hurt to spread my name and show what I do? If business is where I'm headed, self promotion is as important as production. I don't think this is the ultimate way to promote yourself, but what-the-hell!

WELL BACK TO BABY: What you see here is two hours spent laying out the grid and drawing in the outline of my subject. I'm going to go for a fine finish on this "study". It will take a few days; I go slowly on pencil renderings. It's how this old dog was taught.

5 comments:

  1. ADDENDUM:

    I checked out where Winter 2012 might be at Amazon and I only found it on my profile page to which no one would have access. So there's no worthwhile promotional values here that I can see. I also discovered that the book I bought might be totally wrong for me. While I have a few tips of my own on working with acrylics and am always interested in what other acrylic artists know, this book may be more for beginners. I'll see. I may have bought a book more for my granddaughter? I am such a pushover!

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  2. Hi Linda.
    Thank you very much for explaining and showing your Flap-Mat for me. It`s very good of you, thank you. You mentioned Amazon, I would recommend using them for purchases. It cuts down having to give your details out to everyone when you want to purchase anything. And they are very quick in sending your purchase out to you. I ordered a book for my wife yesterday, and it arrived this morning, great eh? Thanks again Linda and all the best. Oh! I nearly forgot. Your drawing of Mum and Baby is brilliant.
    Vic.

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  3. Linda, wonderful post and great art work. Thank you for sharing.

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  4. Joan, the flap-mat was something I learned majoring (at first)in the graphic arts where presentation was strongly stressed. On the job, as a space designer, I didn't use the flap-mat,but I did mount my plans, perspectives and elevations on mat board and adhere a piece of monogrammed vellum to the backside of the board that would flip over the artwork and protect it. Presentation, as I said, is everything. The way you finish a piece for show projects either someone who believes in their work, or someone who doesn't. Maybe that's old school thinking, but I can't shake it when it comes to artworks on paper.

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  5. Can't wait to see the finished drawing.

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