Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Still in Progress


It's slow going with Kelly. I'm combining shading and contour techniques--a lot of weighing of what should be played up,what should be played down? Yesterday, I was involved with the anatomy of her neck. It's twisted. I will play the ligaments and tendons down to soften her appearance, but before I do, I have to have play them up to make the position of the head, tilted back and turned sharply to her right, readable. The anatomy will end up being just a suggestion.

Drawing often calls for subtractive techniques. The most important tools for that are the knead eraser and several erasing templates. I've also pulled out my stubs, I like skin tones looking smooth--not indicated with hatching as many pencil artists do--and not in this case. If only the figure is to be shaded with the background and foreground reduced to contours, I think softly is the way to go. My interest lies in her stroking her streaked blond hair, her eyes, her aristocratic profile, the red wine she's drinking. It's also the way to go to say Kelly. She's a contrast of vulnerability and strong opinions. Too much art talk? Too much thinking. Okay that's it. At least I wish it was.

While working on the computer in black and white the other day, I discovered I'm shy two portraits for my book. Combing through files of family photos with a multitude of pics of grandkids, I came across very few of my first and third sons.I wasn't looking for bust pics. I am not fond of just heads and shoulders. They don't tell you anything about the person and they look stiff. I like people shown living their lives.

All this searching takes time away from painting. But I want to complete that book. Once done, it will easily translate into a promotional brochure. If I'm going to spend so much time with my art, I might as well get into the business of it.

Portraits could be a possible profit center? Plus, as I've said, they're a good evening pass-time. Like some knit and do needlepoint and others read, drawing is a relaxing activity that keeps thinking about what you're doing to a minimum and allows you to keep up with Dexter, The Big C and Weeds.--I'm a little sorry that Kathy told Paul she had cancer. Now the program is in danger of turning soppy. Her husband should have been paying attention to her before she was sick.

4 comments:

  1. I love that drawing... The bit of wine is a great focal point...I haven't watched Weeds so I have not a clue about the characters...U mention about how Paul should of paid more attention now that Kathy has cancer... Why should he have paid more attention?, if he had, would he (assuming) have less guilt? I remember when my brother was killed my mother asked me if i regretted having that heated convo w/him.. I told her no... why walk on eggshells? Same thing she asked me when my husband was killed.. we were having a rough time.. She thought that bad vipes were a precursor for things going wrong... I have no regrets because if I am suppose to be Miss Nicey Nice, then I wouldn't be human.. Not to sound cynical, but it is what it is..

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  2. I agree. You can't sit on your feelings. When I told Honey what I had written, he sided with Paul--said Kathy had mistreated him--kicking him out of the house, having the affair, telling him she'd been unhappy for twenty years. Honey didn't understand that the disease made Kathy angry and she took her anger out on her husband for all his past misdemeanors. She was grieving for herself--anger is a part of grief. She was also putting herself first for a change.

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  3. Hiya, I'm just here after reading your comment on Kathy's blog. Never mind ten years, you're highly skilled now. Just assume you are and start from there. I look forward to seeing this evolve.

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  4. Thank you Mark. I appreciate the encouragement. Trying to imagine where we'll be in ten years,seems silly. We'll all be doing just fine as long as we keep focused.

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