Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Poor John; Poor L.W.

Poor John Adams was subjected to L.W's dissatisfaction
...with her e-mail account. She sat with it all day  trying to clear her Outbox. Though no message was in it, it registered one.  While she could receive messages, she couldn't send them, but she could delete them in the outbox--all except for the hidden one.  By the time she had read all the online help she could stand and restored her system three times because when she closed outlook, it would no longer open, she was upset and had no business picking up her pencil. You can tell the mood she was in by the angry stokes. She would tell you about old John Adams, the second president of the US, bit she's still consumed with the Outlook problem.  She did mention, however as she ran by me screaming and pulling her hair out, how she read there were 2,500,000 people in the 13 colonies in 1776 and one in five of them was black. Everybody in the Congress had slaves--even though  they wrote" All men are created equal." in the Declaration of Independence. It seems they might have been referring to themselves and their English brethren across the sea who the colonists didn't think were supportive enough. Interesting document. John Adams was the chief spokesman for independence. Dickinson from Pennsylvania was opposed. The reps from New York abstained throughout the discussion. Even though, they were counted as pro independence on the final vote July, 2, 1776.

12 comments:

  1. Hope you have sorted the problem out by now Linda. Still, John Adams was a good vent for the frustration, nice determined strokes.

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    1. It lingers on. I feel cut off. So I've run away to the drawing room to see if I couldn't do better by poor John. He's looking grateful. I'd like to darken some areas, but I can't recall what solvent liquefies graphite. The answer is in a sculpture book downstairs, it isn't anywhere online, but I did paint a sculpture with it and I made it myself. Might be turpentine?

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  2. The strong strokes work well. As to the computer problems, the only advice I can give is get a Mac, it changed my computing life. It banished the almost permanent PC Blues, five years trouble free. As an occasional student of US history I much enjoy reading the nuanced argumentation abroad during the moves to independence. Adams is certainly a man worth studying as well as the debates of his age which have had a continuous impact on the thinking of your nation. As an aside The recent TV series about his life was a good watch, as is the current Lincoln movie. Daniel Day Lewis for the oscar, I say.

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    1. I liked the TV series on his life too, but McCullough's book is very interesting and filled with in depth information. I think I'll read 1776 as well. I do think our constitution is as good as they come. It has served us well, but could stand some updating. It's time I read that again too.

      As for a Mac Mick, not in this house. We're a Microsoft family,so HP or Dell--or just open a Hotmail account on this old baby. We haven't seen Lincoln yet. Too much has been going on and quite frankly, now I do not want to go sit in a movie theater and expose myself to God knows what on those chairs and railings. I've had my flu shot, but I also have the sinus cold that won't quit and I haven't been inoculated against the new gastric virus that's going around. I'm reclusive till Spring. Stay well. Stay painting. I'll be back in my studio tomorrow. A week is enough.

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  3. I am chagrined to report that I don't have much knowledge about John Adams. It's cool that you decided to draw him and give us a mini-John Adams lesson. It is a competent drawing, no matter what you say. I agree with commenter Mick Carney about Macs. I have a macbook pro and all is well. In all the years I have owned Mac I only had a couple wee problems while my windows IBM friends have triple the woes. Something to think about!
    How's your knee? :)

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    1. I didn't either that and wanting to download a book on my iPad is what made me download David McCullough's book as I watched him talking about it on 60 Minutes. You have to read slow, for the language back then was quite vocabulary heavy and formal. I'm enjoying it. I found that fact about the population fascinating. I found it fascinating that the Declaration of Independence was actually a long list of grievances against King George III AND their English brethren. They considered themselves to be English and were annoyed that they wee being tyrannized. That word was Jefferson's. He did the first draft of the declaration. The final draft was a group effort where nearly every word was weighed by Congress members and often changed--weakened or strengthened.

      Knee's fine, thanks. I had the stitches out this morning. I did extremely well in physical therapy--enough where I don't think I'll go back.

      I am thinking of getting a new computer. I can't get a Mac. Microsoft supports a portion of this family. I'll have to learn Windows 8.

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  4. I do hope you get the problems sorted ASAP, although the drawing is damned good!

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    1. Nice of you to say. I was such a bulldog not letting go of the email problem and getting on with life, I was totally irritated by the time I sat down with John and he suffered for it.I should liquefy some of the stokes to finish it with a little finesse. Maybe I'll try? The painting I used was done by Gilbert Stuart, but Trumbull and Coply painted him too. I liked Stuart's the best; it seemed the most natural. I am having a good time looking at portraits others are doing to see which way I lean with regards to poses, settings, lighting, finish. On finish, it's definitely gestural.--Got a great book today: Paint From Photographs by Tony Paul. With all the emphasis placed on paint from life, I wanted to explore the other side of the argument. I do favor the use of photographs even though I know their shortcomings. I think knowing their short comings and correcting them, okays their use. I mean, Ellis won't even sit for me, so how would I get a stranger? I'd write all this in an e-mail, but it would just get stuck in my outbox. I do get incoming though.

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  5. Interesting post. However, most of the language/ideas of the Declaration came from John Locke, not Jefferson.

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    1. Not only from Locke either. All the representatives took part in the refining of Jefferson's first draft--and Jefferson expected it. After doing the first draft, McCullough wrote Jefferson sat back and made the changes as the congress decided. He wasn't an egotistical guy. Thanks. Interesting book.

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    2. Maybe he figured he would be President some day, so he took their advice with a smile.

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  6. I have been thinking about you so came over. I just read your last few blogs to catch up and sorry to hear about the vertigo. Awful to have that.
    Enjoyed your Sargent drawings. Enjoyed reading your post and to know you are doing so well. Interesting to hear about how skillful you think the portrait member's works are. Good to have that as a goal. I personally think your work is wonderful with life and energy and some of the more "polished" ones lack that.
    It is great to know we can all have a goal to improve so I certainly will enjoy watching your journey.
    Glad to hear you are on the road to a successful recovery.

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